Not quite what I expected, but I can handle it…

18 Dec

I just got my christmas-present-to-myself box of fabric from Fabric.com! Ooooh pretty pretty fabric….

Just not quite what I expected though, so I’m changing plans.

Firstly, I bought some delicious rayon knit fabrics hoping some nice knits might work well with the whole weight-change crazyiness. I bought navy, plum and lavender. Can I say YUM?!!!

Stretch Slub Rayon Jersey Navy

But much lighter than I expected. And wider! But it will be too hot if I double the fabric up. *sigh* I’ve abandoned the plans and will figure out what I can get out of the fabric as I go.

I just want clothes that fit! So I’ decided to go for TNTs:

And this – without the weird elastic across the boobs effect:

A top-version of this dress of the lilac, with plum trim, I’d only need to line the bodice.

And a t-shirt out of this fabric (butterflies! I love butterflies :-) in the beige view of the pattern below, and if there’s enough fabric, a cute pair of undies too.

Cotton Jersey Knit Butterflies White/Blue

I also bought this stunning peacock craft cotton fabric … and yes it IS as stunning irl as the picture is.

Plume Peacocks Multi/Black

 

… as the panel in this pattern.

I bought half a yard but didn’t think it through that the peacock is upright, not on its side, *facepalm* so unless I want a sideways peacock I don’t have enough length to make the skirt panel. However it’s SO beautiful I am going back to buy a full yard. I’m very sure I can use the excess in something else because it really is stunning.

Lastly, I bought this Downton Abbey fabric (delicious colours Mmmm!)

Downton Abbey Dowager Countess Large Medallions Purple

Planning to make it up in this pattern I bought recently:

However the pattern is very large – especially when it will be draped over a rather short me! Lesson: look at the tape measure in the photo to get an idea of proportion before making plans! No way could I be bothered making myself crazy pattern-matching all those panels, and it would look like a dog’s breakfast without it. My sanity – and really, the fabric – both demand a simply-structured dress.

So…

I’ve always wanted a dress in the style of Picnic at Hanging Rock, but I’ve always been scared if I had one in white, and wore it to a picnic I’d disappear and never come back! Don’t laugh! It’s a serious possibility! Just watch the movie.

Picnic at Hanging Rock tribute by Mirko Macari, via Flickr

However I’m sure if it was in a different colour I wouldn’t be running that risk.

Or should I just go straight for the Downton Abbey styles? The simple cream, or the white with scattered motifs. Or perhaps the dusky rose though that demands two layers over the skirt. Hot :-(

 

There’s a decade or two-ish between when each is set, and really, once pared down to a tropical-wearable dress, there’d be even less difference in a dress. The question is, can one dress fulfil my desire for both a Picnic at Hanging Rock dress and a teens era dress? Must think more on this…

Swirl dress!

1 Dec

Here’s the swirl dress I’ve sewn as part of a sewalong I’ve referred to a couple of times, held by the talented and awesome Sew Retro Rose.

Here I tried the classic pin-up girl pose so commonly seen on sewing and fashion blogs; I think mine needs some work. But it probably won’t get worked on as in taking this photo, the whole ‘pin-up’ women as sexual images for men’s consumption thing did upsetting things to my head. (Hence the rather unsure smirk on my face.)

Moving on to happier thoughts, the front trim for the original pattern stopped at the shoulders. Since I’m not really into coffin dresses, I continued it round the back and down to the waist. A word on the fit of the back, shown below, I think it’s about as good as I can get it until I learn how to fit it more effectively. Due to the wrap-over part it was much harder to work out how or where to take the extra length up, so I just took it off at the waist. It’s good enough.

I love the effect of the bias-cut back skirt that is subtly observable in gingham. The front is on the straight grain, and the back is a semi-circle so curves from straight at the sides to the bias as the edge of the wrap. I love it!

You know, I’m not sure if I was just standing oddly, or not, but in this photo I look like I really do have a sway back. I never thought I did, just that I had a very short back. I should keep an eye out for it to see if that is my natural posture or not.

The side view, for what I can learn about fitting:

  • Perhaps my FBA wasn’t big enough? There’s more differentiation between front length and back length in my body than there is in the dress. Or perhaps it’s being distorted by catching under the arms?
  • The back’s too long but we knew that already :-P
  • It’s also too wide across the shoulders, so it’s catching under the arms when I have my arms forwards, rather than falling away from my arms smoothly like it would if properly fitted across there. I’ll take it in. The skirt’s fine though.

In this photo I don’t look at all like I have a sway back.

See the wavy hem? In the hopes it might flair the skirt in a suitably vintage manner, I put some horsehair braid from my stash in the hem. First time I’ve ever used it, and I’ll definitely use it again, it helped sew the hem really easily and with no warping of fabric as I went round the bias parts of the hem. Awesome!

However, the poor braid had been stored in a nice neat oval-shaped roll for so long, when unrolled and put into the hem, it still held the curves of the roll. I am very sure all I need to do is press it on a suitably low temperature to straighten it out, but I didn’t have time before these photos.

I’ve since washed the dress, (the braid handled being through a normal wash cycle perfectly), but it still causes the waves shown above! So I definitely need to get in there and press it properly flat.

The hair kerchief is one I made years and years ago, blue roses on a yellow background, with toning blue ric rac trim round the edge, all in one of my favourite colour schemes, baby blue and soft yellow. Like the dress! A happy accident that the two matched :-)

Dabbling in pattern drafting, and adapting to weight changes

25 Nov

I’ve started teaching myself to draft patterns. I started with a bodice block using Winifred Aldrich’s book. (It’s metric! YAY!!! After drawing up this chemise in imperial, I gained a very deep appreciation for the simplicity and ease of the metric system.)

Sadly however the bodice wasn’t all it cracked up to be. It won’t fit without major changes. The back will come close but the front is short 5 or so cm. The block is based on the back nape-waist measurement, (left side of piccie)and kinda worked out from there, the front (right side) being based on the back. I am all out front, with a full bust, but a little flat back and flat shoulderblades (they naturally fall in the perfect position for ballet! But hard to fit …) I suspect that’s why the draft is so off.

The mess of the back shoulders came about because it totally didn’t look right when I first drew them, and I tried to compensate a bit. It wasn’t working so I left it for later, and continued on. I’d almost finished the instructions when my partner came in. One look at what I was doing and his whole being lit up in delight. ‘Oh! You’re drafting!’

The guy’s an engineer. And there I was basically trying to engineer a bodice. omgsoexciting!!!!1!!!!1!!

He gave it a quick look over my shoulder, noting the mess of the back shoulder. I explained ‘It just doesn’t look right and I’m not sure why.’

‘Did you check your measurements?’ He said eagerly.

‘Not yet, that was my next step.’

Sure enough, the original measurement was wrongly interpreted and once correct it looked much more like a proper back bodice shoulder.

The amusing thing was telling my mother, and later, my best friend. Their reactions were both rather bristly and defensive on my behalf. The word patronising may have been muttered.

Laughingly, I reminded them that, hey, come on, he’s never once patronised me in his life and, being an engineer, had been so excited to see me doing something so engineery when it came to sewing, which he knows I love so much. And he could not only share in it, but, oh how exciting! he might even be able to help me with this sewing I adore!

It’s an engineer thang. An often quite childlike delight and enthusiasm in engineery-things. Of course, mum and my friend immediately got it – mum’s family’s positively bristling with engineery types, and my best friend herself has an engineering degree. Their Feministic Principals were soothed.

Next I did a skirt block. It was obviously close enough to a good fit to be worth starting with ‘fashion’ fabric. Like with the bodice, years of experience of working with patterns meant that I could see what was likely to work and what wasn’t. A big head start, I suspect, in learning pattern drafting.

So I cut it out in a purple polkadot, ultimately aiming for a purple version of this:

Rockabilly Skirt but in purple

Mouthwateringly awesome huh? I’m dying to go swishing round Darwin in that lovely floofy hemline!

But … my weight changed and when I had time to finally sew up the polkadot fabric 6 weeks later it didn’t fit. At all. So unhappy! So frustrated! I want a pretty purple polkadot floofy-hemmed skirt!

On the bright side it was obvious that without that weight change the skirt block would have worked beautifully. Wow. A basic skirt block is definitely something with a very high return for energy in.

My drafting enthusiasm is now in a sad and sorry heap. Stupid weight changes! It’s too too depressing to have put all that effort into learning to draft the basic blocks, only to have them rendered unusable within a couple of months. And frustratingly my weight is still changing. It’s actually health thang. The PTSD affects my weight like crazy, and most of it’s not even really within my control. I think it’s made worse because my weight changes very evenly over my body, including across my shoulders and hips, which are the two points that are most important in fitting.

My mother observed a few weeks ago that all my adult life my weight’s fluctuated. DUH! She’s right!

Perhaps I need to embrace this, making things that are either a) stretchy b) easily adjustable (like wrap-around things) or c) have 10 different wardrobes I can switch between.

Adapting to fluctuating weight – brainstorming

  • I’m sewing a swirl dress, which is basically a very cool vintage-based back-wrap dress. (Only the hem to go now!) It’s got a good couple of inches adjustment inheret in it. It would make a great top with a little peplum too.
  • I could expand on the swirl dress concept.
  • I’m not a great fan of knit, (it’s hot) and I find it hard to get hold of good knits in natural fibres anyway.
  • Stretch-sateen cotton trousers – these seem to fit well through a range of sizes. Stretch-sateen is a lot easier to find these days than it used to be, so it may be a realistic fabric to build a wardrobe on.
  • Would stretch-sateen cotton also work over a range of skirt sizes? And if so where can I find it with purple polkadots?!
  • I’ve just cut out some wrap-around trousers in a light linen-cotton. I hope I like them.
  • Aa number of other trousers styles are adjustable on a day to day level, I could investigate those.
  • I hate wrap skirts, but there are other options like using an opening as part of a pleat.
  • I am not a fan of elastic but it may be ok if used judiciously (how???) in waistbands?
  • Making clothes so the girth is easily adjusted: eg attaching skirt front to bodice front, skirt back to bodice back, then sewing the sides up in one seam which is easier to adjust.
  • Floofy loose dresses are perfect for the climate I live in and for accommodating any weight changes. And fun to sew and wear :-)
  • I could try belting things, though it gets hot round my waist, but I’d probably get used to it.

As for where that leaves me with the pattern drafting, I really need to think about it more.

‘Well that didn’t work’

13 Nov

Let’s take a look at makes that didn’t work! I did a similar exercise years ago, and discovered every single make that didn’t work came down to either poor finishing or poor fitting, so I took some proper lessons. Best sewing thing I’ve done since actually learning to sew!

Ever since then I’ve keep a list of what I make and how it worked, but it’s good to take a specific look at what doesn’t work, to see what’s to be learnt. Feel free to comment honestly, whether to point out things I’ve missed, or just tell me I’m over-analysing :-P (And please excuse the mirror-selfies. My christmas wish list is basically ‘GOOD CAMERA‘)

Oh noes! My beautiful jacket? I’m so pleased with myself for having pulled the jacket off, but not so pleased with the actual jacket. Important distinction!

The fit just … Not Happy! Too big in the waist, and I’m not sure I can actually fit it close enough to look good either. The huge waist is the pattern itself. What looks like an hourglass pattern from the line drawings …

Photo

is, when you look at the actual pattern pieces, a box with godets at the waist. And I’m not a box with hips. Look at these piccies  – boxes with godets (with apologies to the women who were so kind to do pattern reviews on it). Gah!

I also adjusted the neckline, the original long rectangular neckline was going to look awful when I wore it open.

The peplum-effect is off too. I based the shape on this Burdastyle top, that I’ve made before and found it quite pleasing, but I didn’t pull it off in the jacket. (May not be clear from the pictures.)

113_0812_b_large

Lessons – good

  • I can actually sew with cotton velveteen in this climate! Weehee!
  • A colour that suits me so beautifully draws attention away from poor fit and shape.

Lessons – bad

  • I’m mad at myself for not going with my gut instinct about the fit not being good for my body.
  • More than two major changes to a pattern (waist, peplum, neckline) … might be better looking for a pattern closer to what I actually want?

The A-line knit skirt in the jacket picture got chopped up to make t-shirt yarn. Why? The style was stupidly hard to style nicely on my figure, and the fabric faded badly.

Lesson:

Green dress with roses 

Disclaimer: I ADORE this dress. It’s easy to wear, cool, comfortable, pretty pretty fabric. Looks gorgeous irl, takes me anywhere.

It just isn’t what I intended! It was supposed to be a loose slouchy casual dress, but irl it’s rather dressy. The slouchy look on the pattern envelope isn’t the style, it’s that it doesn’t fit properly on the model. *sigh* Caught out.

I drafted the collar myself. The shoulders ended up too wide – I have to push my bra straps to the edge so they don’t show. (And if they show they look terrible) The collar doesn’t sit well over the buttons.

Lessons:

  • Pretty pretty fabric (especially poplin) is hard to make slouchy and casual! It is extra-important to use a casual pattern to pull it off. Or casual fabric. Perfectly matching hand-crochet trim and buttons aren’t gonna help either.
  • Duh, necklines duh. I made this one up myself, so it was my bad.

No idea about the collar. Use a proper pattern? Only extend the collar to the beginning of the button placket?

A fitting issue -

Guess what it is! (It isn’t the waist being too tight, trust me, these fit me in the waist.)

Lesson:

I still don’t know how to fit my little short back (or back waist?) properly! However, looking at other photos where it is fitted nicely they can be summed up in one word: Empire line.

I think it might be worth a post unto itself actually, comparing what is well-fitted, and what billows, and try to figure out WHY!

Beautiful! But …

I even managed to fit the back nicely!

What’s wrong? The damned thing kept creeping up over my bust and towards the back. The front nearly choked me. And yes, the shoulder seam was supposedly in the right place.

Lesson:

I don’t know! Another top, from this pattern, did it too. (Yeah, vintage, from an op-shop, why do you ask? :-D)

What was happening with the above pattern was not enough fabric across the front shoulders, so it was ‘borrowing’ from the wider bust area, which of course was lower down, so the whole thing slid backwards. Is this what my lovely white top did? I don’t know. I just know I wish I did know to avoid it ever again! Because a similar thing happened with my ‘walkaway dress’ muslin which was actually a top.

That’s enough! I might do more in my sewing visual diary, see what I come up with. I think I’ll do the opposite next blog post and look at why things work!

ETA: Just saw this post on the Sew Sorry So Fat blog. I might use that template (being nice and asking first because I’m just a naturally courteous person so they ain’t got nothing to snark at ;-P )

Charlie’s Aunt retro handbag

31 Oct

Someone complimented me on my handbag today, and I realised I hadn’t reviewed the pattern, Charlie’s Aunt’s ‘Brideshead Bag’ like I’ve been meaning to. So here it is.

I fell head over heels in love with this bag! I mean, hey LOOK at it. Isn’t it gorgeous? Such beautiful style lines!

Let’s be totally honest: I’ve been very wary of Indie patterns for various reasons that have been well-explored by other people in the sewing community; no need to go into them here. So it took a lot of umming and ah-ing to decide whether to risk wasting money on a potentially lousy pattern, or just develop my own based on the pictures.

In the end I decided to buy it in the hopes a formal pattern might actually get me making a bag. Thing is, I don’t like bagmaking but I really needed a new handbag as the old one was falling apart. I couldn’t find one that suited my needs for a price I could afford, in any bag shop. And we won’t talk about the Amazon vendors who refuse to post beyond the US.

What also weighed in the decision to buy the pattern was that I did feel pretty strongly that if I liked the design enough to copy it, the designer ought to be getting some credit and financial recompense for it.

 

Alterations The silly thing in the end was that I actually did end up ‘designing’ most of the bag myself. The pattern size was just too big for my needs. I asked the designer before I bought the pattern if it would downsize ok. She said no, because everything was drawn up in correct proportion to each other and the seam allowances etc.

Pah! Proportion and readjusting seam allowances are bread and butter for me! No worries! So I bought the pattern and made it a good 5-10cm smaller and it did indeed come out just fine :-) I also added in a million more pockets as there were only the one shown on the front, and a similar one with no fastening inside.

The fastening in the pattern was for a magnetic clip between the front and back right at the top. Instead, I chose to put a zip along the top because I have a habit of throwing my bag into the back of the car or onto a chair when I get home and I didn’t want things to fall out. Yes yes I know, similar to my lack of respect for jackets. I expect a lot of my handbags!

I lengthened the strap as I prefer over-the-shoulder bags and widened them for comfort.

 

My biggest regret with the bag is that I didn’t interface the pattern because I like slouchy bags. But then of course the top was soft. making it hard to open and close the zip. *facepalm* Ok, ‘fessing up here, I almost never use interfacing. It’s just one extra layer to make clothes hotter. And the softer the better when the humidity is up, which is like most of the year here. But duh, I should have interfaced the bag. I talked it over (after the bag was made, not before, of course :-P) with a friend who makes a lot of bags and she said interfacing really helps a zip be zippy. Note to self: interfacing a bag won’t make your clothes hotter to wear and will make the bag’s zips work better.

The other negative issue is that the flap is also fastened with velcro. However the velcro disintegrated quickly and hasn’t gripped since not long after I made the bag. The pattern says to use a magnetic clasp, but I went with velcro because I wanted to keep the bag’s weight down. With the zip-top it’s really only decorative anyway, but yeah, I’d go the magnetic clasp next time, regardless of the extra weight.

 

Front (like my little polar bear zip-pull from a friend in Canada? His name is Little Polar Bear :-) I used two different but matching tapestry fabrics from Spotlight. I knew from the wear such tapestry stood up to with this hat, that it would last the distance.

A close-up of the front. The pockets (black tapestry on the lower half of the bag) close with velcro strips I kinda cut and spread to match the curving top. I added the velcro before sewing the side seams. The velcro works really well and stands up to heavy wear as I use them every time I use the bag. I’m pretty pleased with them, and also amused because I get so many comments from people about how they too need a bag with velcro-closing pockets!

Back I’m pretty sure there weren’t back pockets on the original pattern. I just cut two mirroring pocket pieces, then created the back pocket in the same way as the front pockets.

Yeah yeah, the base might have benefitted from some interfacing too! But I do like slouchy bags…

There’s no piccies of the inside because there’s nothing of excitement in there. The outside pockets are enough, and so very convenient to use that I am glad I didn’t bother with doing the inside ones, and they probably wouldn’t have been used.

I’m very happy with my bag! I’ve even gotten used to the soft zip. Little Polar Bear helps with the zipping, too.

Yes I would love to sew it again! I keep thinking I’d love it in a green leather, and it’s a simple enough style I think it would work very well.

But then again, I’m also so very much in love with The kitchen Bag from the same place …

Sewing pattern to make the Kitchen Garden Bag - PDF pattern INSTANT DOWNLOAD

 

Vintage pattern pledge – where I’m at so far

25 Oct

The Bolivian milkmaid’s jacket – done! hehe I’m VERY pleased with myself with that one. I made a jacket! Having said that, I’m planning to refit it before it gets its next outing. But yeah, it’s been sewn and been worn and I love it. Yeah!

Nothing else is finished yet, but there have certainly been developments, like oh you know, a whole lot more patterns I’m planning to make up *sheepish* But I just couldn’t resist …

I signed up to a Swirl Dress sew-along. I’d never even heard of Swirl Dresses, they sound like they might be a purely American phenomena? But the moment I saw the pattern I realised I needed one – you know how it goes ;-) I’ve bought some baby blue gingham for it. I’m looking forward to the sew-along. I’ve never done a sew-along, not my thing, but it’s turning out to be fun, so I may end up actually doing this one. If not I’ll just sew it up on my own.

The next addition came about as a result of a terrible terrible wardrobe tragedy. Sadly one of my most favourite dresses EVAR fell apart on me. Noooooooo!!! Worse still, it’s just the time of year where a loose style of dress is mandatory, weatherwise. I really need to replace it asap, so I desperately searched stashes of fabric and patterns, and came up with this 1974 dress pattern. (My sister’s vintage, aw cute!) The loosish fit through the torso looked good, weatherwise, especially if fitted on the looser side.

Here’s the almost-made dress, donchya love the pretty cotton/lycra satteen fabric?! And see the three pleats at the shoulder? The original pattern has two but I added another pleat as part of my customary FBA adjustment. The seaming details made it so easy to fine-tune the fit, and I can happily report it looks beautifully while still being suitably loose. It’s even a bit swishy, mmm! (It surprised me as sateen doesn’t usually swish.) Now I just have to finish it off. Not my forte, starting projects is so much more fun :-P, but the awful weather is driving me …

I thought the pattern might work on mum, too. I’ve realised recently things that look good on one of us will often work on the other. Only took me 38 yrs to notice mum and I have the same figure, just in different sizes, DUH!!! Her style’s vastly different though, for eg she wouldn’t be seen dead wearing something like this :-D But the 1974 dress? Right up her alley, I suspected. She agreed, so I drafted her size, then cut it out in this fabric. A selfless sewing make could be part of the vintage sewing pattern pledge?

Another addition came about by a much happier incident! Ever since I bought this lovely pattern I’ve been trying to find just the right fabric for it.

1940s Inspired Misses Princess Seam Peplum Blouse Sewing Pattern, Simplicity 1590 or 0229 Sizes 16, 18, 20, 22, 24 uncut

I found it the other day! The fabric colour is actually shades of navy blue through to white,no idea why it came out so grey. *facepalm* It’s much more beautiful irl! So of course this pattern has been added to 2014 sewing list.

The last addition I found in the op-shop the other week. Is it beautiful or beautiful?

V9230

Not needing a swimsuit (I SO hate swimming, I know, so un-Aussie of me *hangs head in shame*) I’ve graded up the knickers part of the ensemble, and cut them out in soft (woven) cotton for undies. Fun! One day, not necessarily as part of the vintage pattern pledge, I wouldn’t mind trying to convert the top/overdress into a proper dress while keeping the overall feel of the style. As for the hat omgsoperfect for a woman with stupidly fair skin living in the tropics! Must make! I haz Big Plans for this pattern!

 

Blue velvet jacket!

15 Oct

I finished it! I wore it! It’s awesome!

See?! See?! Isn’t it beautiful?!

… ok ok enough with the ! and onto some substance… Warm clothes pose problems when you live in the tropics. Unless you never go anywhere else, you not only need warm clothes, you need seriously GOOD warm clothes because you get cold long before people living in a temperate climate do. It’s worse coming from Darwin, because unlike northern Queensland, we never, not even in the depths of ‘winter’, get very cold. 16C is a freezing night for us, with the days still getting up around 30C. Your body just doesn’t get practise at coping with the cold.

Some people simply leave a box of warm stuff with their relatives for when they visit. As kids, our Granny lived in Hobart. Yes, indeed, an entire continent away from all the tropical warmth of Darwin:

Map of Aust + antarctica

 

Granny kept all our warm clothes. Hobart airport was tiny, smaller even than the old Darwin airport back then. We’d shiver our way off the plane, onto the tarmac and finally finally through the doors into the waiting arms of our Granny, who had this comical but deliciously warm hug-while-wrapping-the-grandkid-up-in-a-parker greeting perfected. Next came the ordeal of waiting in a breezy freezing shed for the luggage to be brought in on trailers dragged by tractors. (I wonder if there’s finally got a proper luggage conveyor belt yet?! And if so, is it in that draughty shed?)

However, this approach only works if you visit only one place. But as an adult I have friends and family all over the country, so I need to keep a warm wardrobe here.

A huge hole in my warm-clothes wardrobe has been the lack of a light jacket. I’ve got a big winter one for the times I’m insane enough to visit my brother’s family in NSW Southern Highlands between May and November. But I also need a light jacket cutting out a cold wind and giving just a bit of warmth.

So that’s what this velvet jacket is for.

It also needs to look good (not dated) in 10 years time, because that’s the other thing about living in the tropics, your warm clothes don’t have a chance to wear out. I still have yummy woolen skivvies I bought in NZ over 15 yrs ago. I’ve focussed on building a wardrobe of classics. Ok so a Bolivian Milkmaid’s Jacket isn’t exactly a classic. But a simple princess-line jacket with nipped-in waist, flairing out over the hips is one of MY classic sillouhettes. So is dark blue.

I decided I wanted the jacket longer than the pattern, so I cut one godet per section (The pattern has two) and lengthened it. To be honest, having it the original length might make the jacket more useful. Less warm. The blue velvet is pretty warm.

Looking at the pattern reviews on sewingpatternreview.com the jacket looks nowhere near as shapely as it does in the line-drawing. I tried to bring the waist in a bit on mine, but I didn’t really manage it. It’s the only issue I have with it. In the first photo in this post, I was cheating and pulling it in round the waist, to see whether that is what it needed. I think that and the photos below confirm it would be worth refitting it before my next trip.

The jacket is lovely and soft and unstructured, which is just how I wanted it. It was so soft and comforting to my feet when it was stashed under the seat in front of me while flying. (hey I needed some comfort. I was flying Jetstar. ‘Nuff said?) I really meant it when I said here that I needed a scrunchable jacket :-P Old backpacking habits die hard…

Taken on the path over the dunes to the beach, I’m ‘striking the pose’ here as my friend taking the photos told me to do :-D (She’s a jazz singer, I’m a dancer. We’re such a pair of show-ponies :-D) Like my socks? They’re from Sock Dreams. The blue lace headscarf is a length of fabric from Kerryn’s Fabric World. That tiny width was all I could afford. Fortunately fluffy curly hair looks great with hair-scarves.

Hopeless phone camera is hopeless. *sigh* But you get the idea :-) I love the big sleeves. Although they’re literally half as full as the pattern. I didn’t have enough fabric to do the full deal.

And when it comes to timeless warm clothes, that scruffy-looking skirt is letting the side down. REALLY need to do something about that!

I thought the blue flowers (lobelia I think) would highlight the blue in the jacket but I think as far as achieving that, this photo is a sad FAIL. But hey…

Just a little peak at one of the divine places we visited, this is a beach that went on forever, along the Sunshine Coast. So beautiful! So odd to have the sun set behind the dunes, too…