Setting in 200 zips?

29 Jun

Well it was only 5 this weekend. But it reminded me of when I was about 11 or 12, shopping for fabric with my mum at a very fondly-remembered fabric store in Parap, one of the older suburbs of Darwin – and home to the wonderful Parap Markets. The fabric shop woman taught me a lot about sewing simply by giving me good customer service. She also sewed professionally, as well as running the fabric store, her little workshop up the back behind the back rack of fabrics, but open to customers.

This particular day, she was setting is a zip as we came in. I said to her ‘oh, zips are so hard to set in!’ She gave me an ever so slightly stern look over the top of her sewing glasses and said ‘Not after you’ve set in 200 of them.’

One of the most important lessons I’ve learnt, not just for sewing but dancing, and music and pretty much everything else in my life. Do it enough times and it’s no longer hard or intimidating. Except Pilates, where the moment it gets easy, the teacher makes it harder.

However 5 zips in one afternoon was a lot, even though I ‘m sure I hit the 200 zips mark long ago.

Why was I sewing 5 zips up all at once?

Well I’d been working on these items of clothing and kinda crawled to a stop with each of  them because I had to set the zip in. In the end, after they’d all been sitting there unzippered and unsewn for a while, I collected them all up, set up the iron, got out all the zips, found all the colours of threads I needed along with their matching bobbins, dug out the zip interfacing from the bottom of the interfacing draw, and set them all in!

And look! Here’s the proof! They’re all done! Woohoooooo!

Here’s what they all are…

The red one’s the skirt from this retro pattern:

Simplicity 4044

The light blue chambray is a pair of shorts and dark blue chambray a pair of trousers, both for my mother from Simplicity 2700. It’s her latest TNT trouser pattern. She’s totally in love with it. So am I, because the fit for the curvy figure trousers was almost perfect for her straight out of the packet.

Photo

 

Speaking of chambray, I looked it up to check I had the right spelling and found some interesting stuff on it in Wiki. I had thought it was the same as cambrik, as in the Simon and Garfunkle song. But I was half right and half wrong.

The coral butterflies (which didn’t photograph too well, it’s way nicer in reality) are to be a pair of shorts from some trousers in a Burda magazine that is over 10 yrs old.

And the green and black shot fabric (Although I’ve just learnt, presuming the Wiki article on them is accurate, it could also be called a chambray!) is for a pair of 3/4 length trousers based on this pattern (Previously blogged about here)

 

However I adjusted the pattern by basically cutting it as wide as I could, trying to approximate this recent burdastyle pattern. Although now I look at it again, I think my green ones are going to be a whooooole lot wider than these 😀 :

120_0514_b_large burdastyle cullotes

 

Well, now the zips are all set in, I’d better go sew the rest of the clothes, right?

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3 Responses to “Setting in 200 zips?”

  1. Josie Brady June 30, 2014 at 6:17 am #

    That was an epic effort, and you will be so pleased when you get these garments completed – then you can start on the next lot!

    Like

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. What I’ve learnt about sewing undies | Tropical Threads - July 19, 2014

    […] you’re back to misery. I decided the best thing to do was just experiement. Make 200 undies! (Well, not literally. I  mean the 200 zips concept) figuring eventually it would all make sense. And it did! […]

    Like

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