Archive | Shirts/blouses RSS feed for this section

Tina Givens Luella Tunic look-alike

13 Jun

This is the second Tina Givens look-alike I’ve tried to create. The first one I made I didn’t wear. It just didn’t do it for me for some reason, so I chopped it up into a pair of bloomer-style shorts. The problem was the style – just one of those things you try out and decide it isn’t for you.

Then I saw this post found through Sewingpatternreview.com, and I decided it was well worth giving the Tina Givens look-alike thang a second go, especially as the weather was awful. In Darwin ‘awful’ weather means hot and humid and sticky and disgusting. Loose swingy flowing natural-fibre clothes are by far the best clothes for that weather.

Getting the sort-of-right look in the first dress was so hard I seriously considered just buying the actual Tina Givens Luella Tunic pattern. As well, I’d also recently concluded this dress just wasn’t as I’d really envisioned it, and sent it to the op shop, so I wasn’t feeling that confident with the whole trying to make look-alikes thang. Three points, however, decided me against buying a proper Tina Givens pattern.

  1. I’d made the free Tina Givens Plinka Pants pattern for a friend and the draft was so simple and er, essentially shapeless I didn’t want to spend money on a pattern like that.
  2. I read this post on Curvy Sewing Collective where the reviewer found the actual pattern so big and shapeless she essentially redrafted the fit using a good-fitting pattern of her own, though not the style, to make it fall more flatteringly. This thread on Artisan Square wasn’t exactly inspiring of spending that much $$$ on any of the patterns either.
  3. I’m stubborn and rather enjoy the challenge of trying to copy a picture from the internet, even if I don’t always succeed 😛

So I took my favourite shift dress that I know fits well, adjusts easily and usually still looks good after adjustments. I applied it and my copying skills to some gorgeous peacock craft fabric from Spotlight And got cutting and sewing. Here is the result.

I cut it to fit within the width and length of the fabric I had chosen to use (2.2m of 112 wide fabric) so I essentially got the pattern out of 2.2m. It looks like the Tina Givens pattern takes a lot more fabric, so hey, I’m happy with mine. I can see there’s a bit of a ‘corner’ in the side seams in the original. I chose to not do that, going with a more streamlined side seam.

The overall result is a tunic top I wear so much that the moment it’s been laundered I’m wearing it again.  It’s cool, satisfyingly swishy and the fabric is just gorgeous irl. The piccies of the top itself don’t do justice to it so here is a picture of the fabric itself.

The neckline is high which helps keep the sun off my crazily fair skin, but as I’ve found with this shift pattern, the neckline isn’t too hot. It’s the perfect compromise between sun-sensible and coolness. Probably one reason why this is my go-to TNT shift dress pattern. I also made a little cut-on cap sleeve to keep the sun off my shoulders, rather than longer, hotter sleeves as in the Tina Givens pattern. The coral-red in the fabric just so happens to perfectly match the coral butterfly shorts I’m wearing with it in these photos. It looks lovely with the other coloured shorts and 3/4 trousers in my wardrobe too.

I’ve been in love with floofy dresses for a long time now, especially in the worst time of year weatherwise. Now I’m in love with floofy tops too! Especially when worn with shorts, they are the perfect antidote to stifling mugginess. So … I’ve cut up another length of fabric for another floofy top, this time the floofy coming from released pintucks. It didn’t work out as I envisioned so it’ll be a while before I have redone the top and write about it here. Don’t worry though! I’m having a lot of fun 😀

I suspect that even though I am not inspired to buy any of Tina Given’s patterns I’ll still dream over them on her site. I mean hey, I can totally see myself in this dress…

Or this…

 

Advertisements

Vintage pattern pledge makes

7 Dec

I’ve been diligently sewing vintage patterns all year, but have barely blogged about them. I want to include pattern reviews in my posts about them, but at the moment I’m so confused as to what I’ve sewn, I’ll just line them all up here. That way too, it’s easy for me to pin the pretty piccies to the pinterest vintage pattern pledge board.

Taking it from the top: Folkwear Russian Settler’s sarafan, blogged here.

Folkwear Russian Settlers' dressFolkwear Russian Settlers' Dress | Jumper, Blouse & Apron Sewing Pattern # 128 #Folkwear #RussianSettlersDress:

This blouse is a vintagey style pattern from a Burdastyle mag. Not sure if it counts for the vintage pattern pledge or not.

Folkwear’s Edwardian Underthings camisole (in silk/cotton Mmmmm!!!! With hand-crochet edgings too Mmmm!!!!)

Folkwear's Edwardian Underthings camisole Folkwear's Edwardian Underthings camisole

A nightie in a pattern I just HAD to get, because my mum had it when we were kids and she made my sister and I nighties and a robe to go with it. Simplicity 8198 The grey smudge is my new kitten, Ma’at 🙂

Simplicity 8198Simplicity 8198 Misses' Nightgown and Robe in two lengths Size 12 UNCUT

And a top from the same pattern…

Simplicity 8198

Burda 7977 Not sure this counts either, as it’s more historical than vintage, and again, from a modern pattern. However I’m so glad I finally made it up, having long wanted a surcoat. Here’s my tropical version. I throw it over my dance or pilates gear going to and from the studio.

Burda 7977 surcoatBurda Misses Medieval Dress Costume 7977

 

Why yes thankyou! I do indeed have an ongoing love affair with vintage nightie patterns. This one is Simplicity 6047 made into a top.

Simplicity 6047 Vintage 70's Sewing Pattern Mod Babydoll Pajamas, Puff Sleeve Micro Mini Dress, Blouse, Panties, Nightgown, Maxi GownSimplicity 6047 Vintage 70's Sewing Pattern Mod Babydoll Pajamas, Puff Sleeve Micro Mini Dress, Blouse, Panties, Nightgown, Maxi Gown

And this one is Style 3010

style 3010 sewing patternstyle 3010 sewing pattern

Yet another version of Style 2172 which I’ve decided after goldilocking so many vintage nightie patterns, is my most fave of all…

Style 2172Style 2172

A lounge-dress out of Style 2363

Easy Nightdress 80s Sewing Pattern Style 2363 Vintage NightgownEasy Nightdress 80s Sewing Pattern Style 2363 Vintage Nightgown

A top made out of Simplicity 5030

Simplicity 5030 Vintage 70's Sewing Pattern Lace Yoke, Lacy Hem Shortie Babydoll Pajamas Set, Bloomers Panties, Nightgown, Long GownSimplicity 5030 Vintage 70's Sewing Pattern Lace Yoke, Lacy Hem Shortie Babydoll Pajamas Set, Bloomers Panties, Nightgown, Long Gown

Another version of the retro repro Burda 7109

Burda Misses and Women's Sleepwear 7109 Burda Misses and Women's Sleepwear 7109

(Not a nightie this time :-P) I’m so pleased I made this, too, even though I don’t like it and have plans to redo it into shorts. My version of the 1920’s 1 hr dress, with some pockets inspired by Tina Givens Marcella sewing pattern.

Tina Givens Marcella Dress sewing patternTina Givens Marcella Dress sewing pattern

Style 4890 for me in a wearable muslin, and my mum in Burda 8379 (not vintage!)

Burda 8379 and Style 4890

I’m still working on a few, such as this top from McCalls 4574. Goodness me, that isn’t a nightie pattern!70s Smock Top or Dress, McCalls 4574 Sewing Pattern70s Smock Top or Dress, McCalls 4574 Sewing Pattern

Finish off this version of Style 4890 (not the purple bit at the bottom – that’s the skirt I was wearing the day I was checking the fit.)

Style 4890

Finish off these knit wearable muslins of Wearing History’s sunkissed sweetheart shorts, and the actual shorts themselves.

Wearing History Sunkissed Sweetheart tropical separates - shorts wearable muslinWearing History Sunkissed Sweetheart tropical separates

Hopefully get a picture of the couple of pairs of undies I made using this Vogue 9230

Vogue 9230

Finish these gorgeous trousers from Decades of Style in an olive green linen.

illustration for 1930s sewing pattern for trousers from Decades of Style with wide, gently shaped pant leg

And last but not least a pair of shorts and maybe even a matching bra using Anna Depew’s Pauline tap pants and bra pattern.

Vintage Sewing Pattern Tap Panties Pdf Printable Copy 28 Waist Depew 2005B -INSTANT DOWNLOAD-

Oh, oops that isn’t the last one. That reminded me I started the Anna Depew bra sew-along (hoping I’ll have enough remnants of the silk/cotton of the Edwardian camisole to make into the final bra. Mmmm!)

THIS is the last vintage sewing plan, honest! Honestly honest!

2013 new art

 

*phew* That’s quite a lot there! (Maybe some of those things I want to finish might end up in the 2016 Vintage Pattern Pledge 🙂

Vintage nightie collection, Simplicity 6047

9 Nov

Ok so I have a bit of a thing for the babydoll with bloomers style of nightie. This make, however, is simply a top.

I was inspired greatly by Amanda of Bimble and Pimble‘s Alice top make. So pretty, yet so cool and comfortable. I made three tops from vintage nightie patterns as a result, two more yet to be blogged about.) It’s become one of my favourite tops.

As you can see I cut the neckline out a bit for coolness, making sure the lines of the neck opening worked well with the shape of the yoke.

I kept the very puffed sleeves, of course – as explained before, it’s an Anne of Green Gables thang 🙂 The first time I wore it I kept seeing the huge puffs out of the corner of my eye and felt quite self concious. But I decided not to adjust them because, well, puffed sleeves! Now after the nth time wearing it I adore them.

MOMSPatterns Vintage Sewing Patterns - Simplicity 6047 Vintage 70's Sewing Pattern SWELL Mod Babydoll Pajamas, Puff Sleeve Micro Mini Dress Blouse, Panties, Nightgown, Maxi Gown Size 10:

I couldn’t get a shot that showed the very pretty yellow trim around the edges of the yoke, but rest assured, it’s there 🙂

I’m stoked by the back. I am definitely improving at adjusting for my short back. (More than just a sway back. I’m very short, or maybe just flat, in my middle back.)

The skirt is my basic skirt pattern I’ve made a million times before, this time in denim based on a skirt I found in an op shop from Glassons years ago. Such a classic style, like the original, I’m wearing it frequently. Long splits at each side make it beautifully cool, even for denim.

One last photo, showing the top with a sash at the waist, my favourite way of wearing it. And sleepwalking is my favourite way of taking mirror-photos ;-P

Like my garden? I’m so happy with the lime in the left of the outdoor pictures. It is giving a steady crop of little Tahitian limes. Half a lime in a glass of cool water. Mmmm!

 

Vintage sewing pattern pledge update

29 Dec

The original plans of what patterns to sew totally went out the window. No worries, I replaced them with a whole lot more though.

Firstly what I have done so far:

Bolivian Milkmaid’s jacket in a blue velvet. Mmm! Sadly the fit was so boxy I am not sure I can adjust it to be more flattering. I didn’t like the peplum either, with the boxy waist it just looked huge, not flattering.

Mind you, I learnt an enormous amount! And I also had a lovely jacket for the trip I went on. Here’s the best photo, where I’m pulling the jacket in at the waist in the back. It doesn’t look too bad at all in that photo!

I think this macro I found on Sew Pretty In Pink’s blog. I think it’s appropriate for this jacket too (I so ❤ Anne!)

3dfd4-tumblr_lnqobbivnf1qb5fseo1_500

Next, I sewed up Mrs Conover’s blouse.

Miss Conover's blouse, 1921

 

Here’s my mock-up version in an old sheet that’s a horrible colour on me. I decided it was a terrible pattern, until my mum and best friend both convinced me the icky bit was the fabric, not the style:

 

I found when done up in nice fabric that it was just too big. I took it in, then took it in, then took it in. Each time I did it looked better and better. I finally stopped taking it in when it was this big.

But do you think I could get a decent shot of the front? NOPE!!! and then it was all spoiled anyway when the green fabric colour ran the first time I washed it, and made the yellow icky *cries* I love the top so much I’m planning on trying to fabric-paint the neckband yellow again. *hopes*

Next was the swirl dress! Soooo much fun, the sewalong group was fantastic, and Beccie was also fantastic.

The fourth vintage sew – two dresses from this mid-1970’s pattern

For me…

And for my mum…

Fifth pattern: made the underwear part of this pattern too but no piccies yet.

 

So that’s six garments from 5 patterns.

Well that was my original pledge amount. Why aren’t I finished yet?

Well… I got all inspired by Amanda of Bimble and Pimble’s nightie-tops. (Ok, properly the Alice top 😛 But I just so have a vintage nightie pattern that is very similar to this!) I hope it’s not rude to just borrow the picture of the blog post. But it looks so good! And so cool! And so inspiring! And that dotted swiss voile is made with neon dots!!! (Go read the whole post, that’s one groovy top 🙂

Tessuti-Fabrics-Alice-Top

I just so happened to have bought 3 vintage nightie patterns not long before christmas! (Yeah yeah I love nighties :-P) Now what on earth could I do with those patterns??? I’m aiming for photos and a post about it on New Year’s Eve my mum’s birthday to nicely round out the vintage pattern pledge!

Not quite what I expected, but I can handle it…

18 Dec

I just got my christmas-present-to-myself box of fabric from Fabric.com! Ooooh pretty pretty fabric….

Just not quite what I expected though, so I’m changing plans.

Firstly, I bought some delicious rayon knit fabrics hoping some nice knits might work well with the whole weight-change crazyiness. I bought navy, plum and lavender. Can I say YUM?!!!

Stretch Slub Rayon Jersey Navy

But much lighter than I expected. And wider! But it will be too hot if I double the fabric up. *sigh* I’ve abandoned the plans and will figure out what I can get out of the fabric as I go.

I just want clothes that fit! So I’ decided to go for TNTs:

And this – without the weird elastic across the boobs effect:

A top-version of this dress of the lilac, with plum trim, I’d only need to line the bodice.

And a t-shirt out of this fabric (butterflies! I love butterflies 🙂 in the beige view of the pattern below, and if there’s enough fabric, a cute pair of undies too.

Cotton Jersey Knit Butterflies White/Blue

I also bought this stunning peacock craft cotton fabric … and yes it IS as stunning irl as the picture is.

Plume Peacocks Multi/Black

 

… as the panel in this pattern.

I bought half a yard but didn’t think it through that the peacock is upright, not on its side, *facepalm* so unless I want a sideways peacock I don’t have enough length to make the skirt panel. However it’s SO beautiful I am going back to buy a full yard. I’m very sure I can use the excess in something else because it really is stunning.

Lastly, I bought this Downton Abbey fabric (delicious colours Mmmm!)

Downton Abbey Dowager Countess Large Medallions Purple

Planning to make it up in this pattern I bought recently:

However the pattern is very large – especially when it will be draped over a rather short me! Lesson: look at the tape measure in the photo to get an idea of proportion before making plans! No way could I be bothered making myself crazy pattern-matching all those panels, and it would look like a dog’s breakfast without it. My sanity – and really, the fabric – both demand a simply-structured dress.

So…

I’ve always wanted a dress in the style of Picnic at Hanging Rock, but I’ve always been scared if I had one in white, and wore it to a picnic I’d disappear and never come back! Don’t laugh! It’s a serious possibility! Just watch the movie.

Picnic at Hanging Rock tribute by Mirko Macari, via Flickr

However I’m sure if it was in a different colour I wouldn’t be running that risk.

Or should I just go straight for the Downton Abbey styles? The simple cream, or the white with scattered motifs. Or perhaps the dusky rose though that demands two layers over the skirt. Hot 😦

 

There’s a decade or two-ish between when each is set, and really, once pared down to a tropical-wearable dress, there’d be even less difference in a dress. The question is, can one dress fulfil my desire for both a Picnic at Hanging Rock dress and a teens era dress? Must think more on this…

Vintage pattern pledge – where I’m at so far

25 Oct

The Bolivian milkmaid’s jacket – done! hehe I’m VERY pleased with myself with that one. I made a jacket! Having said that, I’m planning to refit it before it gets its next outing. But yeah, it’s been sewn and been worn and I love it. Yeah!

Nothing else is finished yet, but there have certainly been developments, like oh you know, a whole lot more patterns I’m planning to make up *sheepish* But I just couldn’t resist …

I signed up to a Swirl Dress sew-along. I’d never even heard of Swirl Dresses, they sound like they might be a purely American phenomena? But the moment I saw the pattern I realised I needed one – you know how it goes 😉 I’ve bought some baby blue gingham for it. I’m looking forward to the sew-along. I’ve never done a sew-along, not my thing, but it’s turning out to be fun, so I may end up actually doing this one. If not I’ll just sew it up on my own.

The next addition came about as a result of a terrible terrible wardrobe tragedy. Sadly one of my most favourite dresses EVAR fell apart on me. Noooooooo!!! Worse still, it’s just the time of year where a loose style of dress is mandatory, weatherwise. I really need to replace it asap, so I desperately searched stashes of fabric and patterns, and came up with this 1974 dress pattern. (My sister’s vintage, aw cute!) The loosish fit through the torso looked good, weatherwise, especially if fitted on the looser side.

Here’s the almost-made dress, donchya love the pretty cotton/lycra satteen fabric?! And see the three pleats at the shoulder? The original pattern has two but I added another pleat as part of my customary FBA adjustment. The seaming details made it so easy to fine-tune the fit, and I can happily report it looks beautifully while still being suitably loose. It’s even a bit swishy, mmm! (It surprised me as sateen doesn’t usually swish.) Now I just have to finish it off. Not my forte, starting projects is so much more fun :-P, but the awful weather is driving me …

I thought the pattern might work on mum, too. I’ve realised recently things that look good on one of us will often work on the other. Only took me 38 yrs to notice mum and I have the same figure, just in different sizes, DUH!!! Her style’s vastly different though, for eg she wouldn’t be seen dead wearing something like this 😀 But the 1974 dress? Right up her alley, I suspected. She agreed, so I drafted her size, then cut it out in this fabric. A selfless sewing make could be part of the vintage sewing pattern pledge?

Another addition came about by a much happier incident! Ever since I bought this lovely pattern I’ve been trying to find just the right fabric for it.

1940s Inspired Misses Princess Seam Peplum Blouse Sewing Pattern, Simplicity 1590 or 0229 Sizes 16, 18, 20, 22, 24 uncut

I found it the other day! The fabric colour is actually shades of navy blue through to white,no idea why it came out so grey. *facepalm* It’s much more beautiful irl! So of course this pattern has been added to 2014 sewing list.

The last addition I found in the op-shop the other week. Is it beautiful or beautiful?

V9230

Not needing a swimsuit (I SO hate swimming, I know, so un-Aussie of me *hangs head in shame*) I’ve graded up the knickers part of the ensemble, and cut them out in soft (woven) cotton for undies. Fun! One day, not necessarily as part of the vintage pattern pledge, I wouldn’t mind trying to convert the top/overdress into a proper dress while keeping the overall feel of the style. As for the hat omgsoperfect for a woman with stupidly fair skin living in the tropics! Must make! I haz Big Plans for this pattern!

 

Pretty white tops or: omgitworked!!!

16 Sep

What worked? Well…. Let me tell you the story. I am SO pleased with myself 🙂 although possibly I should just be pleased that the person who drew up the pattern draft was very competent? *ponders* Nah, there was a lot of my own cleverness in there too!

This, this! I made this! From Tudorlinks, a wonderful site with a number of original patterns for historical clothing.

Front View, Lady's Old-fashioned Chemise, 1889 - 1893

 

And that’s as big a picture of the finished product you get. It’s called ‘Lady’s old-fashioned chemise‘.

Now see why I’m so proud of myself. I made one that actually works, fits me well, and that regular readers of my blog will already have seen before. These meagre pictures are solely what I created my pretty white linen top from:

Front Piece, Lady's Old-fashioned Chemise, 1889 - 1893Back Piece, Lady's Old-fashioned Chemise, 1889 - 1893Front & Back Yokes, Sleeve & Sleeve Band, Old-fashioned Chemise, 1889 - 1893

And these instructions:

This 1889 pattern was reprinted in 1893 and it can be used at least as late as that date, though this yoked style was in use from the crinoline era.

Note also that there is a misprint on the back yoke. The part marked “Top” is actually the centre back. We have correctly labelled Top and CB in red.

We do not have the scale measures for drafting this garment, so draft to the size given and then alter to fit.

That’s all I had to go on. I’d like you, dear readers, to note that these are inches, and I’m Australian. I am not too bad at working with inches as my mum, when teaching me to sew used imperial or metric in a kinda random manner, (although she learnt in inches, as a science teacher she quickly learnt metric when it was brought into Australia). I ended up using either kinda randomly too, but for the difficult stuff I always use cm because they make the most sense, and besides everything else in my life has been done in metric so of course I’m by far the best at metric, and this project was difficult!

Measuring systems aside, I managed to get this out of this meagre pattern! (I love the way linen creases so I’m making no apology for its unironed state :-).

So how did I do it?

I printed out the pattern pieces given, and the line drawing, and worked my way through each piece, drafting it onto paper. I added in a bit more of a bust dart and length into the front yoke piece, seeing how I usually need an FBA, and I concentrated the gathered sections to be over the bust at front and in the middle of the back. My experience from sewing old-fashioned nighties showed me that’s where it’s most flattering to add gathered ease in. In the original chemise draft it is evenly gathered along the yoke, front and back. Then I added in my seam allowance. (1.5cm coz I cut my sewing teeth on the Big 4, and that’s what they use.)

I had about 80cm of white linen left over from another project, and I decided to try for a wearable muslin. I love wearable muslins! I’ve also learnt if I’m aiming for a wearable muslin to make it up in fabric I like. Using fabric lying around unused because I don’t like it kinda defeats the purpose of the ‘wearable’ bit.)

Fitting

Initially I figured the yoke section would be too small across the shoulders on the general principle of people being smaller back then, but took a punt on it as drafted, because when I measured my shoulders and the pattern yoke width, they seemed to match up pretty well. And … it fits perfectly 🙂 I suspect it would fit well over a range of sizes actually. On someone smaller across the shoulders it would just sit further out. On me the edge of the yoke hits the tip of my shoulder right where it should in a properly fitted shirt.

The sides fall shorter than the centre front and back, which is very obvious in the second and third photo.  But the length for both front and back pieces are even, so I think that is just the pattern. That they are even suggests to me I got the proportions of the ‘FBA’ right and that this pattern is just drafted to be shorter at the sides. I like it. It’s a flattering gentle curve. I also think at a more chemise-y length it would work nicely as well. If it doesn’t appeal, you could just lengthen it at the side a bit.

The length of the chemise I squeezed out of my fabric was just odd, neither top nor tunic nor dress, so I sewed in some wide horizontal tucks to bring it up to a definite shirt length. I then found some pretty gathered broderie anglaise style lace in my stash that I finished the hem with. It’s so pretty! All feminine and soft and gently sitting round my body in a way that is comfortable and loose and floaty, or all pretty and flattering to my little waist with a belt or sash round the waist.

 

Construction notes

Rather than sewing the yoke together at the centre front, I sewed the pieces separately (I lined the yoke with some cotton batiste) and put some fake pearl buttons on it. I didn’t bother with doing them to properly button and unbutton because I didn’t need it to open to get it over my head. I just sewed the front yoke together with the buttons.

 

The biggest issue I had in putting the whole thing together was the sleeves. Honestly? I’m used to sleeves being cut INTO, not set OUT from the bodice. My modern perspective meant it took me a while to work out what to do with them, what bit to attach to what other bit. The sleeve band is shaped too. Another thing to confuse the uninitiated. It took a few goes and lots of unpicking to get it right. *phew*

My arm is waaay bigger than the sleeve band so I didn’t sew it together at the underarm, and then left the sleeve bit open far enough down to accommodate my modern-sized frame and bowhunter-y arm muscles. It’s really comfortable, which I’m glad of. I really didn’t know how comfortable adding a supposedly sleeve-like affair OUT from the straight edge of bodice would be. But yeah, it works! It’s actually similar in feel when wearing to this chemise pattern (Which, although this silk chemise got sent to my sister, I made the pattern up in cotton as nightie for myself as well. YUM!)

Here it is inside out. The sleeve opening goes down to the bit of a corner in the fabric near the 4 corners of the ceramic tiles at low right. The band only goes for 2/3rd that distance. Did women have tiny arms back then? The sleeve piece itself goes down to the bottom of the picture. You can also see where the batiste inside yoke has pulled away a bit near the shoulder. Oops!

 

The right way out: The seam joining the band to the sleeve is messy and folds out to show on the outside at the bottom of the band where it’s narrower than my seam allowance. If I made it again, I’d make lengthen the sleeve band to fit my actual arm properly, and if it was too narrow to hide the seam properly I’d either widen the band a bit or handsew the inside band down. I hate handsewing so it would be the first option, being entirely honest 😛

I do, however like the way the band is shaped to be wider at the top than the bottom. Just looks nice when the seam is behaving itself 🙂

Conclusion

LOVE it! And I’m keen to try some other vintage and historical pattern drafts floating round the internet, some of which I’ve outlined in this post here.And oh boy am I proud of myself for working out how to draft and make this chemise!

What sewing achievement are you particularly proud of? I’d love to hear 🙂

 

 

%d bloggers like this: