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I accidentally made some Edwardian Drawers.

18 Nov

Yanno, as you do!

Inspiration: I was perusing Wearing History’s patterns when I came across this one

 

I thought to myself ‘Oh I think that’s a circular trouser draft, like the Sunkissed Sweethearts pattern‘ (which also happens to be a Wearing History pattern). Then I thought to myself ‘Oh, but wait! I have a LOT of white broadcloth and voile, I could make one of these using the Sunkissed Sweethearts pattern!’ Then I thought ‘And I could use up all that white lace I keep collecting from op shops. Stashbusting!’

Next thing I knew I’d whipped out the Sunkissed Sweethearts pattern and my copious amounts of white fabric, and had cut out my own rendition of the Edwardian Drawers.

How?

I removed the gathers on the Sweetheart shorts draft (very easy to do) and cut them out in the broadcloth with the curve to the side and extra fabric in the back so I didn’t need closures. The lower part I simply used the curve of the hem on the top part, and cut-and-spread to create a circular ruffle to fit on it.

It was a tiny step from it being cut to having it sewing up. They’re basically elastic-waisted shorts with a fancy ruffle. Too easy! Sewing on the lace took twice as long as it took to make the drawers up. Oh, and unlike in the original pattern description, which has the drawers open in the crotch, I sewed mine together because, like, modern living, like. And I wanted to wear it as outerwear, not underwear!

I put elastic in the front to get it to hug my figure, and a draw-string white ribbon in the back, which ties at the side coz I was silly and put the openings for the drawstring accidentally on the side. Oops!

Around the curve of the upper leg.

Around the lower hem. I need to cut out the fabric from behind the lace. Taking the photo on a darker background might have made it clearer…

I then wore them styled with a white top and a pretty blue sash. The only real FAIL was getting a photo without a silly expression!

You can have me squinting against the glare…

Or me laughing with my eyes closed!

Or a nice expression except my face is turned away from the camera to show off the back.

Back home again, this is to show what it looks like without the top over it. I think they really do look like vintage drawers! *smug*

I love this view. They really do look like so many pictures of Edwardian ladies in their drawers I’ve seen on pinterest. No butt-hugging happening here!

Verdict:

They’re cool, they’re very comfy, they’re very pretty, they’re easy to get on and off. I love them ūüôā

Vintage pattern pledge makes

7 Dec

I’ve been diligently sewing vintage patterns all year, but have barely blogged about them. I want to include pattern reviews in my posts about them, but at the moment I’m so confused as to what I’ve sewn, I’ll just line them all up here. That way too, it’s easy for me to pin the pretty piccies to the pinterest vintage pattern pledge board.

Taking it from the top: Folkwear Russian Settler’s sarafan, blogged here.

Folkwear Russian Settlers' dressFolkwear Russian Settlers' Dress | Jumper, Blouse & Apron Sewing Pattern # 128 #Folkwear #RussianSettlersDress:

This blouse is a vintagey style pattern from a Burdastyle mag. Not sure if it counts for the vintage pattern pledge or not.

Folkwear’s Edwardian Underthings camisole (in silk/cotton Mmmmm!!!! With hand-crochet edgings too Mmmm!!!!)

Folkwear's Edwardian Underthings camisole Folkwear's Edwardian Underthings camisole

A nightie in a pattern I just HAD to get, because my mum had it when we were kids and she made my sister and I nighties and a robe to go with it. Simplicity 8198 The grey smudge is my new kitten, Ma’at ūüôā

Simplicity 8198Simplicity 8198 Misses' Nightgown and Robe in two lengths Size 12 UNCUT

And a top from the same pattern…

Simplicity 8198

Burda 7977 Not sure this counts either, as it’s more historical than vintage, and again, from a modern pattern. However I’m so glad I finally made it up, having long wanted a surcoat. Here’s my tropical version. I throw it over my dance or pilates gear going to and from the studio.

Burda 7977 surcoatBurda Misses Medieval Dress Costume 7977

 

Why yes thankyou! I do indeed have an ongoing love affair with vintage nightie patterns. This one is Simplicity 6047 made into a top.

Simplicity 6047 Vintage 70's Sewing Pattern Mod Babydoll Pajamas, Puff Sleeve Micro Mini Dress, Blouse, Panties, Nightgown, Maxi GownSimplicity 6047 Vintage 70's Sewing Pattern Mod Babydoll Pajamas, Puff Sleeve Micro Mini Dress, Blouse, Panties, Nightgown, Maxi Gown

And this one is Style 3010

style 3010 sewing patternstyle 3010 sewing pattern

Yet another version of Style 2172 which I’ve decided after goldilocking so many vintage nightie patterns, is my most fave of all…

Style 2172Style 2172

A lounge-dress out of Style 2363

Easy Nightdress 80s Sewing Pattern Style 2363 Vintage NightgownEasy Nightdress 80s Sewing Pattern Style 2363 Vintage Nightgown

A top made out of Simplicity 5030

Simplicity 5030 Vintage 70's Sewing Pattern Lace Yoke, Lacy Hem Shortie Babydoll Pajamas Set, Bloomers Panties, Nightgown, Long GownSimplicity 5030 Vintage 70's Sewing Pattern Lace Yoke, Lacy Hem Shortie Babydoll Pajamas Set, Bloomers Panties, Nightgown, Long Gown

Another version of the retro repro Burda 7109

Burda Misses and Women's Sleepwear 7109 Burda Misses and Women's Sleepwear 7109

(Not a nightie this time :-P) I’m so pleased I made this, too, even though I don’t like it and have plans to redo it into shorts. My version of the 1920’s 1 hr dress, with some pockets inspired by Tina Givens Marcella sewing pattern.

Tina Givens Marcella Dress sewing patternTina Givens Marcella Dress sewing pattern

Style 4890 for me in a wearable muslin, and my mum in Burda 8379 (not vintage!)

Burda 8379 and Style 4890

I’m still working on a few, such as this top from McCalls 4574. Goodness me, that isn’t a nightie pattern!70s Smock Top or Dress, McCalls 4574 Sewing Pattern70s Smock Top or Dress, McCalls 4574 Sewing Pattern

Finish off this version of Style 4890 (not the purple bit at the bottom – that’s the skirt I was wearing the day I was checking the fit.)

Style 4890

Finish off these knit wearable muslins of Wearing History’s sunkissed sweetheart shorts, and the actual shorts themselves.

Wearing History Sunkissed Sweetheart tropical separates - shorts wearable muslinWearing History Sunkissed Sweetheart tropical separates

Hopefully get a picture of the couple of pairs of undies I made using this Vogue 9230

Vogue 9230

Finish these gorgeous trousers from Decades of Style in an olive green linen.

illustration for 1930s sewing pattern for trousers from Decades of Style with wide, gently shaped pant leg

And last but not least a pair of shorts and maybe even a matching bra using Anna Depew’s Pauline tap pants and bra pattern.

Vintage Sewing Pattern Tap Panties Pdf Printable Copy 28 Waist Depew 2005B -INSTANT DOWNLOAD-

Oh, oops that isn’t the last one. That reminded me I started the Anna Depew bra sew-along¬†(hoping I’ll have enough remnants of the silk/cotton of the Edwardian camisole to make into the final bra. Mmmm!)

THIS is the last vintage sewing plan, honest! Honestly honest!

2013 new art

 

*phew* That’s quite a lot there! (Maybe some of those things I want to finish might end up in the 2016 Vintage Pattern Pledge ūüôā

Setting in 200 zips?

29 Jun

Well it was only 5 this weekend. But it reminded me of when I was about 11 or 12, shopping for fabric with my mum at a very fondly-remembered fabric store in Parap, one of the older suburbs of Darwin – and home to the wonderful Parap Markets. The fabric shop woman taught me a lot about sewing simply by giving me good customer service. She also sewed professionally, as well as running the fabric store, her little workshop up the back behind the back rack of fabrics, but open to customers.

This particular day, she was setting is a zip as we came in. I said to her ‘oh, zips are so hard to set in!’ She gave me an ever so slightly stern look over the top of her sewing glasses and said ‘Not after you’ve set in 200 of them.’

One of the most important lessons I’ve learnt, not just for sewing but dancing, and music and pretty much everything else in my life. Do it enough times and it’s no longer hard or intimidating. Except Pilates, where the moment it gets easy, the teacher makes it harder.

However 5 zips in one afternoon was a lot, even though I ‘m sure I hit the 200 zips mark long ago.

Why was I sewing 5 zips up all at once?

Well I’d been working on these items of clothing and kinda crawled to a stop with each of ¬†them because I had to set the zip in. In the end, after they’d all been sitting there unzippered and unsewn for a while, I collected them all up, set up the iron, got out all the zips, found all the colours of threads I needed along with their matching bobbins, dug out the zip interfacing from the bottom of the interfacing draw, and set them all in!

And look! Here’s the proof! They’re all done! Woohoooooo!

Here’s what they all are…

The red one’s the skirt from this retro pattern:

Simplicity 4044

The light blue chambray is a pair of shorts and dark blue chambray a pair of trousers, both for my mother from Simplicity 2700. It’s her latest TNT trouser pattern. She’s totally in love with it. So am I, because the fit for the curvy figure trousers was almost perfect for her straight out of the packet.

Photo

 

Speaking of chambray, I looked it up to check I had the right spelling and found some interesting stuff on it in Wiki. I had thought it was the same as cambrik, as in the Simon and Garfunkle song. But I was half right and half wrong.

The coral butterflies (which didn’t photograph too well, it’s way nicer in reality) are to be a pair of shorts from some trousers in a Burda magazine that is over 10 yrs old.

And the green and black shot fabric (Although I’ve just learnt, presuming the Wiki article on them is accurate, it could also be called a chambray!) is for a pair of 3/4 length trousers based on this pattern (Previously blogged about here)

 

However I adjusted the pattern by basically cutting it as wide as I could, trying to approximate this recent burdastyle pattern. Although now I look at it again, I think my green ones are going to be a whooooole lot wider than these ūüėÄ :

120_0514_b_large burdastyle cullotes

 

Well, now the zips are all set in, I’d better go sew the rest of the clothes, right?

Enough with the sewing already!

1 Apr

I need a break from it @_@ <— crazy-looking eyes emoticon. I’ll write about sewing instead. (Kinda like when my mum was writing a physics textbook, and she’s play computer games to have a break from, er, writing at the computer. Amused her offspring no end!)

I’ve been sewing hard all the lovely long Easter weekend. Mmmm! And I’ve well and truly gone over my (attempted) 3 projects only, at a time, rule. Oops!

Here’s the mischief I’ve been getting up to:

1)¬†All the main seams done on the sunburst-pleated version of this New Look dress, in a “wedgewood” colour sateen. (God I love that cotton/lycra sateen as¬†used in my red dress) All the fitting done, just need to finish off.

Interesting note: The sunbeam pleats looked pretty awful across my tummy. Woulda been fine if I had a nice rounded potbelly, or was 5 months pregnant O_O. So I turned the pleats into darts at my mum’s suggestion, the middle one stretching almost all the way across the waist, the others in proportion to it. Looks fantastic!

I’m gonna try making the collar/neckline wider so it will be cooler. Not sure how it will work. Wish me luck!

2) Sewn the main seams and partly fitted a dress in a mid-grey sateen, in this pattern. (Told you I loved that sateen!)

Interesting note: I’ve always wondered how a¬†trapeze-y dress would look on my hourglass figure. Now I know: ¬†sadly, depressingly loose around the middle, unflatteringly tight round the hip. Luckily I’d somehow managed to cut it out so that it was HUGE on me. It was when I took it in to the right size that I discovered the style looked ¬†awful. Thank goodness I cut it out so huge. I’ve got fabric to play with, which gives me high hopes I can fiddle-faddle round with it and get the line and ease to work nicely rather than end up being an ugly paper-bag-over-the-head kinda affair.

It was, however, when I had to pull out yet another version of fitting-basting stitches that my brain went *click* “Can’t do this anymore! I need a break argh!”

Maybe tomorrow…

3) I’ve almost finished a long-sleeved blouse for my mother for our trip to the NSW Southern Highlands to visit family. (The significance of this is that we’ll need much warmer clothes than we ever wear in Darwin). The blouse is a lovely Monet-ish print (sorry, no photo yet) I¬†received¬†from … argh!!! I think it was Modern Vintage Cupcakes? in the recent Swap Your Stash project, (Such fun!) ¬†The fabric ¬†print was a smaller in reality than I’d envisioned from the photo. For some reason that made it a fabric that suited my mother far more than it suited me. Odd eh? But true!

Her go-to blouse pattern is Butterick 6085. I just extended the sleeves to full-length. I highly¬†recommend¬†this pattern btw. Easy, sews together nicely, seams all match well. It’s flattering due to the darts, including on plus-sized figures like mum’s. A rock-solid pattern. (Should do a review on patternreview.com, shouldn’t I!)

Photo

4) And now to my latest favourite pattern. I’m so in love with it!

Photo

I need a pair of trousers for the trip to the Southern Highlands *shivers*. Hopefully I’ll be meeting up with Amanda of Bimble and Pimble to sing 80’s hair band songs¬†enjoy cake, coffee and fabric together! I’m so looking forward to it.

Anyway, trousers, yeah. I’ve done the main seams and fitting on a pair of trousers in black “mechanical stretch” polyester suiting. (Mechanical stretch apparently just means the stretch is in the weave, no lycra added.) I did all the flat-pattern fitting recommended – crotch depth, crotch length, hip width, leg width (not exactly an issue with this pattern :-D) before cutting, and when sewn, I discovered that yippeeee! It needed only minimal adjusting in the back crotch depth and it fit perfectly. I am a Trouser-Fitting Legend, guys! A Trouser-Fitting Legend!

I’m thinking of putting a waist stay or similar in it, coz I know from past experience any stretch round the waist will mean the trousers slide down an inch over the course of the day, lowering the crotch uncomfortably. Usually I just hide a bit of elastic in the waistband but the shaping on these might make a proper waist stay work better.

And just to indulge in more pattern-love (And add a much-needed skirt to my wardrobe) I’m making the skirt out of a raspberry 100% cotton ribstop (ie it’s got pretty little squares woven into it, all in the one colour.). All I did was shorten the pattern in the hip a bit, and voila! it fits perfectly. YAY!

I’m seriously thinking of using this pattern to make something like this skirt in some dark grey cotton ribstop (I ‚̧ ribstop as much as I ‚̧ sateen) Channel my inner steampunk. And as I mentioned before, I need more skirts, especially after losing this one ūüė¶ ¬†*ponders the picture and the pattern* Might need to be a bit fuller, which wouldn’t be hard to do. I may or may not have the hardware stashed away.

Last but not least, (actually it may not even be last, I’ve probably forgotten something) I’ve been experimenting with undies patterns (aka panties or knickers. In my neck of Australia we call them ‘undies’), but that would take up an entire nother post.

***

Oh, wait! I knew there was something else! I’ve been sitting on a half-finished blue linen, calf-length version of this pattern for a while, not sure how to finish it off. I’ve decided on a ruffle round the hem, complete with pintucks, and ties in the seams to allow me to pull it up. Channelling my inner steampunk again, and here I was, totally unaware I had one¬†till today!

100 things challenge – sewing patterns I love #1

2 Nov

Over at Livejournal many of them are having fun doing a 100 posts on¬†things of your choice challenge. 100 books or 100 movies or whatever. I heard of this and immediately thought “What fun! I could so easily write about 100 sewing patterns I love!”

I think I’m gonna do it too. Why not? No idea how long it will take me, especially as I’m going to try sorting out my pattern reviews so they are on this blog as well, (unless someone has worked out how to do a patternreview.com widget for wordpress by now?) so my blog might be flooded with pattern review posts for a while. But I’m figuring with this 100 things challenge, like so much in sewing, it’s the journey, not the destination that is the point.

Well, let’s start with the one that has been hanging round the kitchen bench cutting table for the past month or so, McCalls 4664:

The trousers! I’ve actually never sewn any of the other views but I think I’m up to 10 versions of the trousers.

Why do I love this pattern so much?

  • Takes 10 mins max to cut out.
  • Takes half an hour to sew up now I’ve got it all worked out.
  • As flattering as that kind of garment that clings round the hips/thighs is ever going to be.
  • I’ve made it in a nice thick cotton/lycra knit, two stretch-wovens, a really flowing knit. All it takes to make it softer and more flowing (and mor flattering!) is just add extra to the side seam. So easy! I’ve also made two pairs of jammie trousers from it. One short, one long and warm for travel, both very nice to lounge round in or sleep in.
  • It’s seen me through a good couple of sizes of weight changes up and down – same as above, simply adjusting the side seams works, I don’t need to redo the crotch-line or inner-leg seams. It’s kind of bullet-proof.
  • I’ve made a really nice straight-leg palazzo-trouser out of the pattern, very practical pilates trousers, simple black shorts (stretch-woven) to wear under flippy dance skirts, as well as (again stretch-woven) a basic grey simple pair of forgettable trousers, that lends itself to beautiful tops that you notice more because of the forgettableness of the trousers.

Piccies? Lemme see…

The Forgettable Trousers (which I’m actually wearing today. So comfy!) See what I mean? Do you see the trousers in this piccie or the gorgeous top? (Click on the link to take you to the blog post)

The travel jammies trousers. (I don’t have the piccie when completely finished, but that purple trim across the shoulder of the top ended up sewn along the neckline, hem of sleeve and hem of the top, and the hem of the trousers. So cute! (Click on the link to take you to the blog post).

Pattern Love

10 Oct

Thurlow Trousers…

Sewaholic Patterns Renfrew Trouser pattern

The pattern description: Finally, a modern trouser pattern designed for curvy hips, fuller thighs and a narrow waist! The Thurlow Trousers sit below the waistline, with a slightly flared leg. Pockets in front are subtle slash pockets that won’t add bulk to the hips.

Did you read that? Curvy hips, fuller thighs and narrow waist. Me me me. That’s me! Me!

Look at how lovely Dana_knockouts’ linen trousers look. Mmmmm. I could do the Thurlow Trousers in a linen like this. Mmmm…

 

 

I’m intrigued and inspired by these Zoot Trousers by Weekend Designer (who wrote 100 awesome blog posts then sadly went on to other things.) They make me want to dance in them!¬†The author makes it look so easy to draft your own. However if it isn’t so easy after all I have a Plan B. I’ve got some beautifully-fitted wide-legged TNT trouser pattern. I can adjust that as per his directions.

A friend sent me some real Liberty of London fabric, actually from London. So soft and fine! Exquisite. And it is such a lovely subtle floral design.How lucky am I? Thanks Josie! ¬†I think I’ll use it for my version of these.

Weekend Designer's Zoot Alors

Weekend Designer also showed how to design some pleated shorts.¬†We’re heading straight into shorts and tiny singlets weather. I’m thinking I might make a pair.

Weekend designer cuffed shorts

And I have the perfect fabric for them, sent to me by a friend in Florida. Thanks Jackie!¬†Funky Flamingos or what? I’ve only got 1m of it, so I found some blue with white polkadot fabric to co-ordinate with it. I’m thinking pink for the main shorts, blue for the cuffs. Maybe a co-ordinating plain pink for a tie belt, too.

Flamingo cotton fabric

Pleats have really been grabbing my attention lately. This entire dress is lovely. I like the shoulder pleats and the neckline, but it’s the side pleats on the skirt that really drew my attention.

McCalls 4633

Then I saw this New Look pattern and realised for my leafy green cotton lycra sateen, it was perfect. View C (what the model is wearing). I’ve used a TNT skirt pattern, and made the hemline slightly asymmetrical (Good for short people like me!) and the ruffle not as full. Almost finished it.

However I can’t seem to let go of the idea of a pleated skirt. I love this patternless skirt ¬†made by kbenco for her daughter. ¬†I have some red cotton/lycra sateen burning a hole in my stash …

 

There isn’t a pleat at all on this hat, but the shape is so divine I had to have it. My excuse is I live in a climate where hats are almost mandatory, even if almost no one wears them but me.¬†The¬†Heather Bailey Boho Cloche:¬†Glam up your wardrobe with Boho Cloche hats.¬†Reminiscent of the flapper hat of the roaring 1920s, this cloche (French for ‚Äúbell‚ÄĚ) offers a comfy design that flatters every face shape. Perfect for a day in or a night out, the Boho Cloche embodies French flair in a carefree style that is tr√®s magnifique!

This one is in the mail as I type. Hurry up Mr (or Ms?) postman!

Heather Bailey Boho Cloche pattern

Unexpected compliments!

27 Sep

I was in Spotlight yesterday. I know, what a surprise eh? Buying up big on some sagey green cotton lycra sateen. Lovely fabric. Destined (so I think at the moment, I reserve the right to change this at any time) to be a skirt with a bit of a circular ruffle at the hem.

The lovely lady behind the counter asked me how I was going to use it. I explained, and she exclaimed in delight. “You have to come in and show us when it is done. I love seeing the things all made up!”

I realised then that I was wearing these trousers, blogged here,

So I gestured to my trousers and told her I’d made them. “From that ribstop cotton you guys have had for ages that keeps ringing up at $2 per metre.”

At which the woman in the queue behind me said “WOW.” As the sales assistant was looking very impressed.

I said “AND I got the pattern from an op-shop for 20 cents. It’s the same vintage as me. 1976!” All the while thinking “The crotch is a bit funky. I know how to fix it but I haven’t gotten round to it. But I’m definitely not going to point it out, and I hope they don’t notice.” *

They certainly didn’t seem to notice anything untoward about the trousers at all.¬†Hey, I tell you, they were both looking pretty impressed by then. And I felt extremely well complimented about my sewing (and thrifting) skills.

Thanks guys! You totally made my day! And made me feel great about myself ūüôā

(It occurred to me on the way home the crotch seam looked fine, it’s just been feeling a bit odd since I started with pilates and built up plenty of muscle tone in my legs. It just needed taking out a bit. Which, of course, I did the moment I got home!)

*This determination not to point out my (or my clothes, or more usually my birds nest hair’s) perceived flaws comes from my mum. When I was a teenager complaining about what I was sure was a huge zit in my face that the entire world must be staring at, mum would say vaguely “Oh, do you have a zit? I hadn’t noticed till you pointed it out.”

Did wonders for my self esteem. I’m planning on doing to my darling little girl when she is old enough to get zits.

 

 

 

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