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Vintage nightie collection: Style 3010

1 Nov

Last year I joined the Vintage Pattern Pledge, which got me finally using some of my coveted but never sewn vintage patterns. It was so much fun this year I just kept sewing up vintage patterns. Most of them so far this year have been nighties. Well, variations on a vintage nightie them.

Apart from the appeal of living in one’s jammies or nighties, the general lack of figure-huggingness makes up into clothing just perfect for the heat and humidity that characterises my home, Darwin.

Style 3010 vintage nightie pattern dress

Teal butterflies! What more can a girl want? Well, enough fabric left on the roll to make a dress. Lacking that I just bought what was left, and realised when I shopped my stash it went beautifully with this turquoise linen. I was a bit worried the linen would be hot but it’s loose weave so it’s actually quite breezy.

I used Style 3010

style 3010 sewing pattern - Google Search

It’s a bit of a coffin-nightie. The back is a basic shift dress, not empire line like the front. Not sure if the designer thought it would be more comfortable in bed? The back of the negligee was empire-line however, so I used that instead. The sleeve has a smooth head but I always need to increase in the bicep, which usually ends up accidentally increasing the sleeve head. Rather than adjust it back out, I usually just gather it up. It’s an Anne of Green Gables thang ;-P

Style 3010 vintage nightie pattern dress

The skirt’s a bit wider than the pattern too. I’m not as skinny in the hips compared to waist and bust as the pattern seemed to think a woman ought to be, so I just used double the width of the fabric. I think it came out looking close to the original style.

My only real issue with this is the bust dart. Creating my usual FBA, I decided to split the dart into two. I had considered rotating some of the extra out at the side-front of the bodice. That’s very easy in an empire top but the pattern had hardly any of the bust shaping there and I wanted to stay true to the style out of curiousity more than anything.

The two darts were very hard to get sitting just right. In the end I went for ‘the best I can achieve while keeping my sanity’. The sides just kept puffing out. Faffing with it after it was finished revealed it’s due to being a bit big across the front, rather than having two darts being the problem. But hey, it’s a nightie-dress. Loose is good! And I’ve learnt something for next time.

Here’s my favourite picture. No I wasn’t doing ballet (not then anyway ;-P), I was picking a black thread off the skirt I’d noticed as my picture was being taken!

Style 3010 vintage nightie pattern dress

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A christmas vintage nightie

20 Oct

My sister in law Sandra has long been a fan of my vintage nighties. I’m planning on making her a christmas present of  a pretty floral vintage nightie of her own. And as she wants to learn to sew better, but hasn’t had much chance to learn, as part of her present I’ll give her the nightie pattern and a tutorial on how to sew one herself.

My main issue is fit – she lives some thousands of kilometres away. Badly organised of us, isn’t it 😦 Sandra’s sending me a top that fits her to help me get the size right. I’ve been trying to figure out a pattern for her – my go-to vintage nightie pattern is originally a vintage (ie tiny!) size 10. I’ve upsized it to fit me, but I don’t feel confident it can upsize further (She’s a tad bigger than me) while keeping the integrity of the pattern. You know how it is! Patterns can be sized up or down approximately 2 sizes, but usually not more before the fit gets so warped you have to start over again with a bigger or smaller draft.

I’ve been looking for a solution… and I found this in a local charity-run op-shop.
Isn’t it deliciously hideous???

Simplicity 7944 womens nightgown and robe by RavensNestPatterns, $8.00:

It’ll probably be too big (given it’s modern sizing, thus huge …) But between it, my go-to pattern, and her nicely-fitting top, I feel confident I can create a decent nightie pattern. Here’s my tiny-sized vintage go-to nightie pattern, isn’t it pretty?

It makes up like this:

And this:

I reckon I know how to turn Hideous into Pretty. There are two big differences between the patterns:

1)Hideous has a very full, straight skirt, Pretty has a gently-gathered, moderately-full at the top, a-line skirt.

2)Hideous has a yoke that comes across from the front of the armscye, Pretty’s yoke goes just underneath the armscye. I know from a pattern similar to Hideous but much prettier (also, sadly a tiny size) shown below, a yoke finishing at the mid-armscye can look Pretty, and is also roomy for sleeping in. My go-to yoke under the arm pattern can be restricting across the upper bust when wriggling in your sleep like I do. Mid-armscye yokes have their merits.

Hmm…. I notice this pattern’s skirt is also a moderately-full A-line.

A minor difference between Hideous and Pretty, is how the gathers are arranged. Hideous is gathered evenly across the yoke. Pretty has them gathered where the fullness is actually needed – above each bust. The back gathers are concentrated in the centre, which also looks pretty.

Then there’s the pattern art. Pretty’s pattern art uses Very Pretty Fabrics. Hideous’s pattern art uses, well, hideous fabric. I can’t imagine that blue fabric being anything other than ugly, staticy harsh nylon stable knit of the type my Granny would be very familiar with. Ugh.

But that needn’t bother anyone as, of course, Sandra’s nightie is going to be made in Very Pretty Fabric!
T2Xv57XchaXXXXXXXX_!!20371978

Oh, and the Hideous pattern cost 20c. The woman at the counter tried to charge me only 10c.I said ‘Oh it said patterns were 20c.’
‘Oh! … Well I’d better charge you 20c then!’
‘Yes I think you ought to!’

🙂

ETA: My beloved partner proofreader seemed to think the Hideous pattern wasn’t all that Hideous, really. Well, each to their own, I think it’s Hideous 😛

A fascination with vintage nighties

13 Oct

A sewing friend’s 10 yr old daughter is interested in learning to sew. They’ve decided to start with bags and move on to a nightie.

 

Of course, I have to do what I can to help my friend inspire her daughter to sew! Thus, I’ve been er *cough* researching nighties all afternoon. My tastes tend towards vintagey, old-fashionedy stuff, so that’s what I was *coughs* researching… I’m sure a 10 yr old will find them as fascinating as I do, right? Right!

There are a number of basic types of nightie patterns – I tried to find versions with appealing pattern envelope art but if necessary, ignore the art and just look at the lines of the garment. All these are for sale on Etsy, at varying prices.
Yoked – straight-ish, v-necked or roundish
Simplicity 8198 Misses Nightgown and Robe Pattern, Two Lengths, Size 14

McCalls 3155 1980s Misses Pullover Tent Dress Muu Muu Pattern Scoop Sweetheart Neck Womens Vintage Sewing Pattern Size XL B 44 46 UNCUT

Simplicity 5030 1970s Misses Baby Doll Pajamas Nightgown Pattern Womens Vintage Sewing Pattern Size Medium Bust 34 36 OR Small Bust 31 32

Simplicity 6047 misses size 14 bust 36" waist 28" Nightgown shortie PJ pajamas loungewear vintage Sewing Pattern
So many fancy variations on the yoke theme.

Kwik Sew 994 1970s Misses Evening Length Nightgown Pattern Raglan Sleeve Womens Sewing Pattern Size xs s m l Bust 31 - 41 UNCUT
1920s Women"s Nightgown Dress Lingerie Sewing Pattern Minerva 5783 Bust 34
7237 Simplicity petite 6 Miss Pattern Misses Nightgown in Two Lengths Panties Vintage 1975 Uncut

OOP Folkwear Sewing Pattern 224 Beautiful Dreamer Womens NIghtgown Size 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 Bust 30 1/2 to 42 UnCut 1900s Nightgowns
Vintage nightdress pajamas & sleepsuit sewing pattern - Style 3388 - size 10 - 12 - 14 - 16 ( 32.5" - 34" - 36" - 38" bust) - 1981 - unused
Kwik Sew 876 1970s Misses Kimono Sleeve Peignoir and Nightgown Pattern Womens Vintage Sewing Patterns Size S M L XL Bust 32 - 45 UNCUT

 

This gorgeous crochet-yoked nightie was from a magazine pattern illustration. You can find crochet yoke patterns here: http://www.antiquepatternlibrary.org/html/warm/crochet.htm
EARLY 1900"s COTTON NIGHTGOWN dress under layer L

Then there’s the straight thru, one-piece types.
1969 Sew-Knit-N-Stretch 214 Ladies Nightgown Sizes S-M-L Kerstin Martensson Baby Doll Nightgown Sewing Pattern Misses PJ Pattern u

This one is one-piece straight through but some views have elastic to pull it in under waist to create an empire look.
Size 8&10 Vintage 60s Misses" Baby Doll Nightgown In 2 Lengths Jiffy Simplicity Sewing Pattern 8252 Sizes 8 10

So uninspiring! Kwik Sew art just doesn’t do it for me…
Kwik Sew 2239 Misses Tank Style Nightgown and Camisole PatternLingerie Womens Sewing Pattern Size XS S M L XL Bust 31 - 45 UNCUT

I’m in love with this one and may have to either buy it or work out how to draft it myself.
Kwik Sew 993 1980s Misses Evening Length V Neck Nightgown Pattern Lettuce Edging Womens Sewing Pattern Size xs s m l Bust 31 - 41 UNCUT

Empire line is another classic nightie style, but its success as a wearable garment, I’ve always felt, depends on having perky boobs, which I don’t. Probably not so much of an issue for my friend’s 10yr old 😛 Here are some pretty variations!
Kwik Sew 717 1970s Misses LINGERIE Pattern Full Slip Pattern Lettuce Edging Womens Vintage Sewing Pattern Size s m l xl Bust 32 - 43 UNCUT
Simplicity 1136 1940s Ladies Lingerie Pattern Misses Nightgown Negligee Pattern Womens Vintage Sewing Pattern Size 12 Bust 30
Vogue 8887 / Vintage 70s Sewing Pattern / Nightgown Empire Gown Babydoll Pajamas Panties / Size 12 Bust 34
Never Used Pattern Pieces 1940s Butterfly Nightgown Anne Cabot"s Needlecraft Corner 5138 All 3 Sizes Possible

Some are (often strange) conglomerations of many style details.
1940s yoke and cut on sleeve fancy thingie. Or is it a raglan-sleeve straight-through nightie?
Vintage 50s Nightgown Pattern New York 1210 Size 17 Bust 35 UNCUT
1980s glam girl!

Sexy ROBE & NIGHTGOWN, UNCUT, F/F, Size 16-18, Bust 38"- 40", Butterick 4669.
1940s
1942 Simplicity 4456 Size Bust 34 Hip 37 Casablanca-Style Womens Nightgown Sewing Pattern Vintage Sewing Pattern Supply Lana Turner Gown

Then there are the ‘wtf you’re planning to sleep in that?’ nightie styles. (I think the above might qualify for this category too.)
VTG McCall"s 4731 Misses V Plunge Nightgown and Pinafore Look Nightgown Pattern, Size Petite, UNCUT

Yes this WAS designed as a nightie!

Vintage Simplicity 4980 1950s nightgown pattern Bust 30 shelf bust tie shoulder fitted waist Full skirt Grecian peasant dress

So was this!
Kwik Sew 1813 1980s Misses Lace NIGHTGOWN Pattern Drop Waist Overlay Skirt Womens Vintage Sewing Pattern Size xs s m l Bust 31 - 41 UNCUT

 

Folkwear’s Russian Settler’s dress: Sarafan

22 Mar

A bit late for last year’s Vintage Pattern Pledge, but hey, it’s done! And please to also admire my lovely overgrown garden 🙂 It’s about 3 times bigger out there now, the middle of the wet, than it was when these piccies were taken towards the beginning of the wet season. This picture was taken on a dark cloudy day in murky light, but the camera picked up all that glare. Inneresting…

Oh wait, this is a sewing blog? Not gardening? oh ok then…

I used this lovely pattern from Folkwear:

Construction:

The construction is supposed to be very straightforward. Two rectangles of fabric, the front one with a bit of shaping at the top for the waist. I added in a dart at bust-level to accommodate my D-cup bust, however I could have gotten away without it.

I accidentally adding some shaping round the waist and hips, where the pattern is literally straight down. I cut it a bit wrong then to fix it I needed to add to the hips. I wish I’d been able to make it without that hip shaping. I figure why bother making something different to your usual fare then accidentally make it half-similar after all. Ah well…

The pleats were also straightforward, till I misread the tape measure (dyslexia, honest!) and thus miscounted. Lots of faffing round and eyeballing it eventually got it Good Enough. In the notes on the history of the Russian Settler’s sarafan it says the women making them would do the pleats completely by eyeballing it, creating a mass of tiny pleats. Wow. I’m impressed!

I brought the ribbons up from where they were indicated on the pattern and still they held the pleats down to my waist. I was after more of an empire-line skirt. More swishy. Butterflies need to swirl!

Sarafans usually have two straps from the front, joining as one in the centre-back. I made two so I could wear it with a bra, without a top on underneath the dress.

Preparing the pleats – a task impossible without the help of a sewing-cat …

All pleated fairly evenly. Finally!

Getting distracted by a ta-ta lizard on the screen door

The pattern said traditionally the hem is finished with rows of ribbons and matching lace. I envisioned it with a good few inches of lace, but the only matching lace was very narrow, though prettily gathered. So I used the same fabric as the chest bands and shoulder straps as a ruffle to add to the effect. I may or may not be a total sucker for ruffles of any sort 😛

This photo makes me laugh, I look like I’m Receiving The Light! However I wanted to show how flat the front is on this style of dress. I wanted something different to my usual fitted silhouette and I got it 🙂 I love how the fabric released from the pleats curls over the hips and flares nicely.

Lovely, isn’t it?

It just had one major flaw. So major in fact that I’ve cut the top band off and will remake it as a Tina Givens-style lagenlook-y dress (Well that’s the plan, at least.)

In butterfly purple and grey   A sort of modern does 1920s dress. Greta dress by Tina Givens

The flaw? Look at the hemline in the above photo, the front is higher than the back. It wasn’t sewn that way, but there’s twice as much fabric in the back as front, so gravity pulls the whole dress backwards after only a few minutes of wear (or adjustment). The front chest band rides up nearly to the neck. It was SO uncomfortable. I tried some lingerie straps to help anchor it, they didn’t work at all. I considered a waist stay but the loose nature of the dress made that inappropriate. It’s actually a similar issue to the realities of the Walkaway Dress that so many people found. The heavy back pulls the whole thing out of alignment.

GAH!!!

And it was such a pretty pretty dress *mourns*

To be fair to the pattern there’s one version with equal amounts of fabric front and back. I’m sure that would have worked out just fine.

I am sure I can create something equally lovely, maybe even with better swirl for the butterflies on the fabric to swirl beautifully. But I’m still very very sad about this not working 😦

Mind you, there’s a definite satisfaction in just having made the dress, and all those pleats! And I have the photos to prove it 😛

You can find a pattern review here

Vintage sewing pattern pledge update

29 Dec

The original plans of what patterns to sew totally went out the window. No worries, I replaced them with a whole lot more though.

Firstly what I have done so far:

Bolivian Milkmaid’s jacket in a blue velvet. Mmm! Sadly the fit was so boxy I am not sure I can adjust it to be more flattering. I didn’t like the peplum either, with the boxy waist it just looked huge, not flattering.

Mind you, I learnt an enormous amount! And I also had a lovely jacket for the trip I went on. Here’s the best photo, where I’m pulling the jacket in at the waist in the back. It doesn’t look too bad at all in that photo!

I think this macro I found on Sew Pretty In Pink’s blog. I think it’s appropriate for this jacket too (I so ❤ Anne!)

3dfd4-tumblr_lnqobbivnf1qb5fseo1_500

Next, I sewed up Mrs Conover’s blouse.

Miss Conover's blouse, 1921

 

Here’s my mock-up version in an old sheet that’s a horrible colour on me. I decided it was a terrible pattern, until my mum and best friend both convinced me the icky bit was the fabric, not the style:

 

I found when done up in nice fabric that it was just too big. I took it in, then took it in, then took it in. Each time I did it looked better and better. I finally stopped taking it in when it was this big.

But do you think I could get a decent shot of the front? NOPE!!! and then it was all spoiled anyway when the green fabric colour ran the first time I washed it, and made the yellow icky *cries* I love the top so much I’m planning on trying to fabric-paint the neckband yellow again. *hopes*

Next was the swirl dress! Soooo much fun, the sewalong group was fantastic, and Beccie was also fantastic.

The fourth vintage sew – two dresses from this mid-1970’s pattern

For me…

And for my mum…

Fifth pattern: made the underwear part of this pattern too but no piccies yet.

 

So that’s six garments from 5 patterns.

Well that was my original pledge amount. Why aren’t I finished yet?

Well… I got all inspired by Amanda of Bimble and Pimble’s nightie-tops. (Ok, properly the Alice top 😛 But I just so have a vintage nightie pattern that is very similar to this!) I hope it’s not rude to just borrow the picture of the blog post. But it looks so good! And so cool! And so inspiring! And that dotted swiss voile is made with neon dots!!! (Go read the whole post, that’s one groovy top 🙂

Tessuti-Fabrics-Alice-Top

I just so happened to have bought 3 vintage nightie patterns not long before christmas! (Yeah yeah I love nighties :-P) Now what on earth could I do with those patterns??? I’m aiming for photos and a post about it on New Year’s Eve my mum’s birthday to nicely round out the vintage pattern pledge!

Swirl dress!

1 Dec

Here’s the swirl dress I’ve sewn as part of a sewalong I’ve referred to a couple of times, held by the talented and awesome Sew Retro Rose.

Here I tried the classic pin-up girl pose so commonly seen on sewing and fashion blogs; I think mine needs some work. But it probably won’t get worked on as in taking this photo, the whole ‘pin-up’ women as sexual images for men’s consumption thing did upsetting things to my head. (Hence the rather unsure smirk on my face.)

Moving on to happier thoughts, the front trim for the original pattern stopped at the shoulders. Since I’m not really into coffin dresses, I continued it round the back and down to the waist. A word on the fit of the back, shown below, I think it’s about as good as I can get it until I learn how to fit it more effectively. Due to the wrap-over part it was much harder to work out how or where to take the extra length up, so I just took it off at the waist. It’s good enough.

I love the effect of the bias-cut back skirt that is subtly observable in gingham. The front is on the straight grain, and the back is a semi-circle so curves from straight at the sides to the bias as the edge of the wrap. I love it!

You know, I’m not sure if I was just standing oddly, or not, but in this photo I look like I really do have a sway back. I never thought I did, just that I had a very short back. I should keep an eye out for it to see if that is my natural posture or not.

The side view, for what I can learn about fitting:

  • Perhaps my FBA wasn’t big enough? There’s more differentiation between front length and back length in my body than there is in the dress. Or perhaps it’s being distorted by catching under the arms?
  • The back’s too long but we knew that already 😛
  • It’s also too wide across the shoulders, so it’s catching under the arms when I have my arms forwards, rather than falling away from my arms smoothly like it would if properly fitted across there. I’ll take it in. The skirt’s fine though.

In this photo I don’t look at all like I have a sway back.

See the wavy hem? In the hopes it might flair the skirt in a suitably vintage manner, I put some horsehair braid from my stash in the hem. First time I’ve ever used it, and I’ll definitely use it again, it helped sew the hem really easily and with no warping of fabric as I went round the bias parts of the hem. Awesome!

However, the poor braid had been stored in a nice neat oval-shaped roll for so long, when unrolled and put into the hem, it still held the curves of the roll. I am very sure all I need to do is press it on a suitably low temperature to straighten it out, but I didn’t have time before these photos.

I’ve since washed the dress, (the braid handled being through a normal wash cycle perfectly), but it still causes the waves shown above! So I definitely need to get in there and press it properly flat.

The hair kerchief is one I made years and years ago, blue roses on a yellow background, with toning blue ric rac trim round the edge, all in one of my favourite colour schemes, baby blue and soft yellow. Like the dress! A happy accident that the two matched 🙂

Charlie’s Aunt retro handbag

31 Oct

Someone complimented me on my handbag today, and I realised I hadn’t reviewed the pattern, Charlie’s Aunt’s ‘Brideshead Bag’ like I’ve been meaning to. So here it is.

I fell head over heels in love with this bag! I mean, hey LOOK at it. Isn’t it gorgeous? Such beautiful style lines!

Let’s be totally honest: I’ve been very wary of Indie patterns for various reasons that have been well-explored by other people in the sewing community; no need to go into them here. So it took a lot of umming and ah-ing to decide whether to risk wasting money on a potentially lousy pattern, or just develop my own based on the pictures.

In the end I decided to buy it in the hopes a formal pattern might actually get me making a bag. Thing is, I don’t like bagmaking but I really needed a new handbag as the old one was falling apart. I couldn’t find one that suited my needs for a price I could afford, in any bag shop. And we won’t talk about the Amazon vendors who refuse to post beyond the US.

What also weighed in the decision to buy the pattern was that I did feel pretty strongly that if I liked the design enough to copy it, the designer ought to be getting some credit and financial recompense for it.

 

Alterations The silly thing in the end was that I actually did end up ‘designing’ most of the bag myself. The pattern size was just too big for my needs. I asked the designer before I bought the pattern if it would downsize ok. She said no, because everything was drawn up in correct proportion to each other and the seam allowances etc.

Pah! Proportion and readjusting seam allowances are bread and butter for me! No worries! So I bought the pattern and made it a good 5-10cm smaller and it did indeed come out just fine 🙂 I also added in a million more pockets as there were only the one shown on the front, and a similar one with no fastening inside.

The fastening in the pattern was for a magnetic clip between the front and back right at the top. Instead, I chose to put a zip along the top because I have a habit of throwing my bag into the back of the car or onto a chair when I get home and I didn’t want things to fall out. Yes yes I know, similar to my lack of respect for jackets. I expect a lot of my handbags!

I lengthened the strap as I prefer over-the-shoulder bags and widened them for comfort.

 

My biggest regret with the bag is that I didn’t interface the pattern because I like slouchy bags. But then of course the top was soft. making it hard to open and close the zip. *facepalm* Ok, ‘fessing up here, I almost never use interfacing. It’s just one extra layer to make clothes hotter. And the softer the better when the humidity is up, which is like most of the year here. But duh, I should have interfaced the bag. I talked it over (after the bag was made, not before, of course :-P) with a friend who makes a lot of bags and she said interfacing really helps a zip be zippy. Note to self: interfacing a bag won’t make your clothes hotter to wear and will make the bag’s zips work better.

The other negative issue is that the flap is also fastened with velcro. However the velcro disintegrated quickly and hasn’t gripped since not long after I made the bag. The pattern says to use a magnetic clasp, but I went with velcro because I wanted to keep the bag’s weight down. With the zip-top it’s really only decorative anyway, but yeah, I’d go the magnetic clasp next time, regardless of the extra weight.

 

Front (like my little polar bear zip-pull from a friend in Canada? His name is Little Polar Bear 🙂 I used two different but matching tapestry fabrics from Spotlight. I knew from the wear such tapestry stood up to with this hat, that it would last the distance.

A close-up of the front. The pockets (black tapestry on the lower half of the bag) close with velcro strips I kinda cut and spread to match the curving top. I added the velcro before sewing the side seams. The velcro works really well and stands up to heavy wear as I use them every time I use the bag. I’m pretty pleased with them, and also amused because I get so many comments from people about how they too need a bag with velcro-closing pockets!

Back I’m pretty sure there weren’t back pockets on the original pattern. I just cut two mirroring pocket pieces, then created the back pocket in the same way as the front pockets.

Yeah yeah, the base might have benefitted from some interfacing too! But I do like slouchy bags…

There’s no piccies of the inside because there’s nothing of excitement in there. The outside pockets are enough, and so very convenient to use that I am glad I didn’t bother with doing the inside ones, and they probably wouldn’t have been used.

I’m very happy with my bag! I’ve even gotten used to the soft zip. Little Polar Bear helps with the zipping, too.

Yes I would love to sew it again! I keep thinking I’d love it in a green leather, and it’s a simple enough style I think it would work very well.

But then again, I’m also so very much in love with The kitchen Bag from the same place …

Sewing pattern to make the Kitchen Garden Bag - PDF pattern INSTANT DOWNLOAD

 

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