Tag Archives: nightwear

Unexpected compliments!

27 Sep

I was in Spotlight yesterday. I know, what a surprise eh? Buying up big on some sagey green cotton lycra sateen. Lovely fabric. Destined (so I think at the moment, I reserve the right to change this at any time) to be a skirt with a bit of a circular ruffle at the hem.

The lovely lady behind the counter asked me how I was going to use it. I explained, and she exclaimed in delight. “You have to come in and show us when it is done. I love seeing the things all made up!”

I realised then that I was wearing these trousers, blogged here,

So I gestured to my trousers and told her I’d made them. “From that ribstop cotton you guys have had for ages that keeps ringing up at $2 per metre.”

At which the woman in the queue behind me said “WOW.” As the sales assistant was looking very impressed.

I said “AND I got the pattern from an op-shop for 20 cents. It’s the same vintage as me. 1976!” All the while thinking “The crotch is a bit funky. I know how to fix it but I haven’t gotten round to it. But I’m definitely not going to point it out, and I hope they don’t notice.” *

They certainly didn’t seem to notice anything untoward about the trousers at all. Hey, I tell you, they were both looking pretty impressed by then. And I felt extremely well complimented about my sewing (and thrifting) skills.

Thanks guys! You totally made my day! And made me feel great about myself 🙂

(It occurred to me on the way home the crotch seam looked fine, it’s just been feeling a bit odd since I started with pilates and built up plenty of muscle tone in my legs. It just needed taking out a bit. Which, of course, I did the moment I got home!)

*This determination not to point out my (or my clothes, or more usually my birds nest hair’s) perceived flaws comes from my mum. When I was a teenager complaining about what I was sure was a huge zit in my face that the entire world must be staring at, mum would say vaguely “Oh, do you have a zit? I hadn’t noticed till you pointed it out.”

Did wonders for my self esteem. I’m planning on doing to my darling little girl when she is old enough to get zits.

 

 

 

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Tropical dreams inspired by Folkwear’s Beautiful Dreamer nightgown

26 Sep

Nightie from McCalls 8108

McCalls 8108 1 hour dresses

  • Fabric/trims/notions used
Fabric is a quite finely woven cotton from Lincraft in Brisbane over a decade ago. Thus proving that yes indeed I do use almost all the fabric in my stash … eventually.
1 inch wide white cotton batiste and embroidery lace, and a turquoise trim (polyester) from Spotlight
  • Inspiration
I’ve been in love with Folkwear’s Beautiful Dreamer for ages, (Of which I have the adult version of the children’s one pictured below) but the whole thing is just too heavy and hot for tropical nights. So I got my TNT McCalls 1 hour (in their dreams, more like 4-5 hr) pattern, and went to town with pintucks, lace and woven trim.
Here’s a close-up of some of the detailing
  • Useful info
I did the pintucks the traditional (?) way of folding over the fabric where I wanted the pintuck and sewing in a millimetre or two from the edge. I lost count of how many pintucks I did. In addition to the ones pictured on the front and sleeve, I did ones on the back, and around the bottom ruffle as well. I was driven completely barmy by them. So much so that when I next went into Spotlight and saw some soft white cotton voile with pintucks already sewn into it, I bought 3m on the spot. My slightly crazed justification was “So I’ll never have to sew another pintuck!!!”
  • Construction notes

I cut the fabric into two big pieces, one for the front, one for the back. I then measured carefully where I wanted the pintucks to sit across my shoulders, and how deep I wanted them to go. I did the same for the back, but since they were in the centre it was a lot easier to work out what do to with them.

Next I did the pintucks on each piece, ironing the fold first on the ironing board where it was easier to measure them all up accurately, then stitching them. Then I cut the pattern out from the big pieces. With the side seam I just pushed all the extra fullness from the pintucks into the centre fold, so I was essentially cutting the same pattern, but just wider by the amount I’d used in the pintucks. Because the pattern is so simple it worked really well.

I also kept the side bust dart in the pattern, mainly because I am noticeably fuller in the front than back. A combination of a c-cup front and a very flat, short back means that I do need proper shaping in the front. Otherwise the fabric pulls up and sits out at the front, looking awful and feeling uncomfortable. I know it is a nightie and all, but I wanted one that looked pretty and felt pretty, not one that was a compromise.

For the ruffle pintucks I cut the ruffle the required length (For ruffles I generally use a length that is half again of the thing I’m gathering onto. So in this case, the nightie hem was 2m wide, I made the ruffle 3m wide.) I sewed the pieces together with a flat-felled seam, making sure I was creating a circle, not twisting the pieces into a figure 8! Next, I sewed the pintucks. 5 of them x 3m ruffle. O_o

  • Cost
Uh, uh… if you’ve had the fabric for so long you’ve forgotten how much it cost does that mean it is free?
Trims $6 total
Pattern: $0. This was the 6th or 7th use?
Impulse purchase of ready-pintucked cotton from Spotlight $30. (I know I know…*sheepish*)
  • Last word

This fabric gets softer and softer each wash. A very nice trait in a nightie! And I feel so romantic and delightful in my lovely nightie 🙂 It is comfortable to sleep in, and nice to waft round the house in when awake!

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